Tag Archives: Blue Moon

January 1st Full Wolf Moon 6:25 P.M. Pacific Time

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The Full Wolf Moon
The Full Wolf Moon 2018

From The Farmer’s Almanac:

“The early Native Americans did not record time by using the months of the Julian or Gregorian calendar. Many tribes kept track of time by observing the seasons and lunar months, although there was much variability. For some tribes, the year contained 4 seasons and started at a certain season, such as spring or fall. Others counted 5 seasons to a year. Some tribes defined a year as 12 Moons, while others assigned it 13. Certain tribes that used the lunar calendar added an extra Moon every few years, to keep it in sync with the seasons.”
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JANUARY FULL MOONS
January 2018 is a very special month:

“The month’s first full Moon, the Full Wolf Moon, rises on January 1. What a great way to start the year!
A second full Moon (a Blue Moon) rises on the 31st, and brings the year’s only eclipse for North America just before dawn. Its total phase can be seen from west of the Mississippi and in western Canada.
Both of January’s full Moons are Supermoons!”

JANUARY SUPERMOONS: FULL WOLF MOON & BLUE MOON

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“Full Moon names date back to Native Americans, of what is now the northern and eastern United States. The tribes kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full Moon. Their names were applied to the entire month in which each occurred. There was some variation in the Moon names, but in general, the same ones were current throughout the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior. European settlers followed that custom and created some of their own names. Since the lunar month is only 29 days long on the average, the full Moon dates shift from year to year. Here is the Farmers Almanac’s list of the full Moon names.”

The Full Wolf Moon – January Amid the cold and deep snows of midwinter, the wolf packs howled hungrily outside Indian villages. Thus, the name for January’s full Moon. Sometimes it was also referred to as the Old Moon, or the Moon After Yule. Some called it the Full Snow Moon, but most tribes applied that name to the next Moon.”

“Each tribe that did name the full Moons (and/or lunar months) had its own naming preferences. Some would use 12 names for the year while others might use 5, 6, or 7; also, certain names might change the next year. A full Moon name used by one tribe might differ from one used by another tribe for the same time period, or be the same name but represent a different time period. The name itself was often a description relating to a particular activity/event that usually occurred during that time in their location.”
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“Colonial Americans adopted some of the Native American full Moon names and applied them to their own calendar system (primarily Julian, and later, Gregorian). Since the Gregorian calendar is the system that many in North America use today, that is how we have presented the list of Moon names, as a frame of reference. The Native American names have been listed by the month in the Gregorian calendar to which they are most closely associated.”
https://www.almanac.com

August’s Full Blue Moon: The Full Sturgeon Moon August 20

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Blue Moon
Blue Moon

August’s Full Blue Moon: The Full Sturgeon Moon will be 100% full August 20 at 6:45 P.M Las Vegas time.

Full Moon Names
August is the month of the Full Sturgeon Moon. Some Native American tribes knew that the sturgeon of the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain were most readily caught during this full Moon. Others called it the Green Corn Moon or the Grain Moon.

The following video, featuring Amy Nieskens, is from The Old Farmer’s Almanac

Comments
By Tom Weston
"In 2013, the August moon will REALLY be a Blue Moon. That is, it will be the third full moon in the summer season which has four full moons in 2013. This is the original, correct definition of a Blue Moon. The definition about the second full moon in a month is a more recent simplified usage."

BACK EAST
Historically, the Native Americans who lived in the area that is now the northern and eastern United States kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to the recurring full Moons. Each full Moon name was applied to the entire lunar month in which it occurred. These names, and some variations, were used by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior.

Me-Na-Wa, a Creek warrior, McKenney and Hall, 1837.
Me-Na-Wa, a Creek warrior, McKenney and Hall, 1837.

Creek
Southeast, Alabama, Georgia
According to WWU, in the Creek language the name for August's Moon is: "hiyo-rakko" “Moon of the Big Harvest.”

OUT WEST
From Western Washington University:
American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year. Here [is the information from one tribe.]

Kalapuya Tribe Member
Kalapuya Tribe Member

Kalapuya
Pacific Northwest, Oregon
According to WWU, in the Kalapuya language the name for August's Moon is: "akupiu" “End of Summer Moon.”

From WIKI
"The descendants of the Kalapuya tribes and bands married extensively into other tribes throughout the northwest and within the reservation, and most now have multiple native ancestries. Most Kalapuya descendants are enrolled at The Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon. There are an estimated 4,000 Kalapuya descendants." Read more...

"Clothes washed for the first time in the full Moon will not last long."
"If you glimpse the new Moon over your right shoulder, you will have good luck."
"To have a project prosper, start it during the new Moon."
"Babies born a day after the full Moon enjoy success and endurance."

August's Blue Moon: Lunar Oddity of Night Sky Explained
by Joe Rao, Skywatching Columnist - Space.Com | August 16, 2013 01:25pm ET

When the moon rises Tuesday night (Aug. 20), it brings us the August full moon and in addition, it will also technically be a "Blue Moon."

"But wait a minute," you may ask. "Isn't a Blue Moon defined as the second full moon that occurs during a calendar month? Tuesday’s full moon will be the only full moon of August 2013. So how can we call it a 'Blue' moon?"

Yet it still is a Blue Moon, but only if we follow a now somewhat obscure rule of astronomy. In fact, the current "two full moon in one month" rule has superseded the rule that would allow us to call Tuesday’s full moon "blue." Read more...

The Old Farmer's Almanac
Western Washington University

Full BLUE Moon: August 31, 6:57 A.M. PDT

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There will be yet another Full Moon Aug 31, 6:57 A.M. Las Vegas time.

“The August 31 Blue Moon will not be blue in color. This August 2012 Blue Moon will be called Blue because it is the second full moon of a month.”

The following article is from Earthsky.Org

According to modern folklore, a Blue Moon is the second full moon of a calendar month. Learn how this name came to be, in this post. The next Blue Moon is August 31, 2012.

August 2012 is a month with two full moons. And, by popular acclaim, that means it’s a Blue Moon month – but it’s Blue in name only. That’s because a Blue Moon is sometimes defined as the second full moon in a calendar month. The first full moon is August 1. The second full moon is August 31, 2012.

It’s very rare that you would see a blue-colored moon, although unusual sky conditions – certain-sized particles of dust or smoke – can create them. Blue-colored moons aren’t predictable. [So don’t be misled by the photo above.] The sorts of moons people commonly call Blue Moons aren’t usually blue. For more about truly blue-colored moons, click here.

Now on to folklore’s Blue Moons. Every month typically has a full moon (although sometimes February doesn’t). In fact, our word for “month” comes from the word “moon.” Most of the time, the names for full moons coincide with particular months or seasons of the year. So whether you define a Blue Moon as the second full moon in a month – or the third full moon of four in a season – the name Blue Moon accounts for times when there are more full moons than is ordinary.

Blue moon as second full moon in a month.[sic] In recent decades, many people have begun using the name Blue Moon to describe the second full moon of a calendar month.

“There are two more definitions for Blue Moon. It can be the third of four full moons in a single season. Or, someday, you might see an actual blue-colored moon.” read more from Earthsky.Org

From LasVegasBuffetClub.Com:
Blue Moon” is a classic popular song. It was written by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart in 1934, and has become a standard ballad. The song has been covered as a released single by artists such as Billie Holiday, Mel Torme, Elvis Presley and Cliff Richard. In popular culture, the song has featured in musical films such as Grease and “Blue Moon” is sung by Crewe Alexandra fans, whilst also being regarded as the anthem of Manchester City Football Club read more from WIKI…

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There will be a FULL BLUE MOON – November 21, 2010 at 9:29 A.M

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Adobe Moon in the City
Adobe Moon in the City

The moon will be 100% full November 21, 2010 at 9:29 A.M. Las Vegas time.

The following very fine information is from EarthSky.Org

“Yes. Today’s November full moon is a Blue Moon. It isn’t blue in color. It’s only blue in name – at least, by one definition. Tonight’s moon is the third of four full moons in a season. So many will call it a Blue Moon.”

“There is a more modern definition of Blue Moon. It’s the idea that a Blue Moon is a second full moon in a calendar month. The next Blue Moon to fit this description will come on August 31, 2012. Is one definition better or more true than the other? The great thing about folklore is that it’s whatever the folk say it is. So we all get to decide.” read more…

Back to EarthSky.Org’s pages:
“Today’s Blue Moon definition comes from old editions of the Maine Farmer’s Almanac. Here are the facts. Generally, there are only three full moons in any one season. Three in summer, three in autumn … you get the idea. By season, we mean the period of time between a solstice and an equinox or vice versa, but of course there’s nothing official about that definition of a season either. But we digress.”

“In 2010, four full moons fall in between the September equinox and the December solstice. The third of the season’s four full moons may be called a Blue Moon, according to the old Maine Farmer’s Almanac definition.”

“So today’s full moon is a Blue Moon. It’s the third of the season’s four full moons. Almanac makers like to give each full moon a name, depending on where the full moon falls relative to the year’s two equinoxes and two solstices. But when a single season presents four full moons, the extra full moon throws a monkey wrench into the otherwise ordered nomenclature of full moons. It is easier for almanac makers to call the third – rather than the fourth – full moon a Blue Moon.”

According to American folklore, the name for this full moon is: November: Hunter’s Moon, Frosty Moon, or Beaver Moon

Thank you, EarthSky.Org.

This is from The Old Farmer’s Almanac:
“Historically, the Native Americans who lived in the area that is now the northern and eastern United States kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to the recurring full Moons.”

“Each full Moon name was applied to the entire month in which it occurred. These names, and some variations, were used by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior.”

The name given for this month’s moon is: Full Beaver Moon – “For both the colonists and the Algonquin tribes, this was the time to set beaver traps before the swamps froze, to ensure a supply of warm winter furs. This full Moon was also called the Frost Moon.”

Here are some links for Elvis Presley’s mega hit record from the 50s, “BLUE MOON.”
“Blue Moon” is a classic popular song. It was written by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart in 1934, and has become a standard ballad.” more from wiki…

“Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart were contracted to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in May 1933. They were soon commissioned to write the songs for Hollywood Party, a film that was to star many of the studio’s top artists. Richard Rodgers later recalled “One of our ideas was to include a scene in which Jean Harlow is shown as an innocent young girl saying – or rather singing – her prayers. How the sequence fitted into the movie I haven’t the foggiest notion, but the purpose was to express Harlow’s overwhelming ambition to become a movie star (‘Oh Lord, if you’re not busy up there,/I ask for help with a prayer/So please don’t give me the air…’).” The song was not even recorded and MGM Song #225 “Prayer (Oh Lord, make me a movie star)” dated June 14, 1933, was registered for copyright as an unpublished work on July 10, 1933.[]” read more…

Read the lyrics to Blue Moon on MP3Lyrics.Org

YouTube video from Jackiej61too

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Once In A Blue Moon: Full Blue Moon On New Year’s Eve – December 31, 2009

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Adobe Moon In The City Poster
Adobe Moon In The City Poster
c. 2009 LasVegasBuffetClub

The BLUE MOON will be 100% full December 31, 2009 at 11:14 A.M. Las Vegas time.

The following article is from Universe Today, by Fraser Cain

A lunar month takes 29.53 days. This is the amount of time it takes for the Moon to complete a cycle through all the phases, from new moon to full moon and then back to new moon again. This is very close to the length of a month in the Western calendar, which usually have 30 or 31 days. Every month usually has one of each of the phases. So a typical month will have a new moon, first quarter, full moon and last quarter moon. But every now and then, a month will have two of the same phases. When a month has two full moons, the second one is called a “blue moon” read more…

OUT WEST

Beautiful Cherokee Woman
Beautiful Cherokee Woman
WWU photograph

“American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year.”

The full moon on December 2, 2009 was called one or more of the following: Full Cold Moon, Snow Moon or Moon When The Wolves Run Together. Since December has two full moons the second moon (December 31) is called (American/Anglo) The Blue Moon.

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“Elvis [Presley] recorded [the song] Blue Moon at Sun Records on July 6, 1954, according to tcbeus.”

“Blue Moon” is a classic popular song. It was written by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart in 1934, and has become a standard ballad” read more from Wiki…

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From Linda Moffitt, Examiner.Com:
The Blue Moon Superstition and Other Moon Names

Full Moons bring up thoughts about the crime rate going up, more babies being born, average people turning into werewolves. Every twenty-eight days the full moon rises to illuminate the skies this equals twelve moons a year, but what happens when there is a thirteenth moon, the Blue Moon?

Every few years the thirteen moon rises. In the twentieth century, there were only forty blue moons. Since the moon is so rare it is believed, the moon holds mystical powers. If you make plans under the Blue Moon, they will come true. However, be careful the moons powers are unpredictable and you may get your wish but it may be more than you want. December 31, 2009 is the next Blue Moon.

Native Americans started calling the moon names each month to keep track of the seasons. The Farmer’s Almanac names the twelve moons as follows read more…

The [c.2009-LasVegasBuffetClub – Adobe Moon in the City] poster is available for purchase. The full moon in this poster was photographed in Las Vegas in the 90s. The image was inserted into it’s “frame” with a Photoshop type application. The poster is 24″x36″.

Find the Best New Years Eve Parties in Las Vegas – Vegas.Com

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