Tag Archives: Western Washington University

Full Harvest (Corn Maker) Moon September 19, 2013 at 4:12AM Las Vegas Time

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Saguaro Moon
Saguaro Moon - Credit & Copyright: Stefan Seip

From The Old Farmer’s Almanac
Full Moon Names
The full Moon nearest the autumnal equinox (September 23 this year) is called the Harvest Moon. This Moon is not just the full Moon that occurs at the time of the harvest. It is the full Moon that actually helps the harvest by providing more light at the right time than other full Moons do.

The following video, featuring Amy Nieskens is from The Old Farmer’s Almanac

From The Old Farmer’s Almanac
Historically, the Native Americans who lived in the area that is now the northern and eastern United States kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to the recurring full Moons.

Each full Moon name was applied to the entire lunar month in which it occurred. These names, and some variations, were used by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior.

Full Corn Moon
This full Moon corresponds with the time of harvesting corn. It is also called the Barley Moon, because it is the time to harvest and thresh the ripened barley. The Harvest Moon is the full Moon nearest the autumnal equinox, which can occur in September or October and is bright enough to allow finishing all the harvest chores.

From Western Washington University
American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year. Here is the information for two tribes:

BACK EAST

Abenaki storyteller and writer Joseph Bruchac
Abenaki storyteller and writer Joseph Bruchac

Abenaki

Northeast, Maine
According to WWU, in the Abenaki language the name for August’s Moon is: “skamonkas” or “corn maker moon.”

OUT WEST

Comanche Spring - a one-day celebration of Comanche culture featuring Benny Tahmahkera, right, and Marla Nauni - will be Saturday in Pioneer Amphitheatre in Palo Duro Canyon State Park.
Benny Tahmahkera, right, and Marla Nauni

Comanche

Southern Plains
According to WWU, in the Comanche language the name for September’s Moon is: “taboo mua” or “paperman moon.“

The Old Farmer’s Almanac
Western Washington University

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From National Geographic Online
4 Sky Events This Week: Harvest Moon, Green Giant, and Fall Equinox
Posted by Andrew Fazekas in StarStruck on September 16, 2013

This week two of the brightest planets join forces, and sky-watchers celebrate the change of seasons with a bright full moon.

Saturn and Venus. Starting on Monday, September 16 after sunset, Venus and Saturn will be having a close encounter that will last most of the week. Low in the southwest sky, the second planet from the Sun will be the first visible—as the brightest star-like object in the entire heavens.

Look carefully next to Venus—binoculars may help—and fainter Saturn will pop out of the glare of dusk. Remember that since the two worlds are hot on the heels of the setting sun, they sink below the horizon less than an hour later.

The lord of the rings will pass only 4 degrees above the goddess of love—less than the width of your three middle fingers at arm’s length. As the week progresses both planets will appear lower in the sky each night with Venus sliding a bit towards the left of Saturn.

Even the smallest backyard telescope will show off Saturn’s iconic rings and even some of its brightest moons—like Titan and Enceladus. Read more…

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July’s Full Moon: The Full Buck Moon July 22

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Adobe Moon in the City
Adobe Moon in the City

July’s Full Moon: The Full Buck Moon will be 100% full July 22, at 11:16 A.M. Las Vegas time.

The following video, featuring Amy Nieskens is from The Old Farmer’s Almanac

Historically, the Native Americans who lived in the area that is now the northern and eastern United States kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to the recurring full Moons.

Each full Moon name was applied to the entire lunar month in which it occurred.

These names, and some variations, were used by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior.

More later

Full Pink Moon – May 25th at 12:59 Las Vegas Time

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Full Pink Moon
Full Pink Moon

From The Old Farmer’s Almanac:
Each month, we will explain the traditional names of the full Moon along with some fascinating Moon facts. This month, learn about the Full Pink Moon, and the Best Days to do certain activities based on the Moon’s phases.

BACK EAST
Historically, the Native Americans who lived in the area that is now the northern and eastern United States kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to the recurring full Moons.

Each full Moon name was applied to the entire lunar month in which it occurred.

These names, and some variations, were used by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior.

April’s moon is called the “Full Pink Moon
This full Moon heralded the appearance of the moss pink, or wild ground phlox—one of the first spring flowers. It is also known as the Sprouting Grass Moon, the Egg Moon, and the Fish Moon.

OUT WEST
From Western Washington University:
American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year. Here [is the information from one tribe.]

Apache, Southern Plains
According to WWU, in the Apache language the name for April’s Moon is: “Moon of the Big Leaves.”

The Old Farmer’s Almanac
Western Washington University

The Full Worm Moon: March 27, 2013 at 2:30 A.M. Las Vegas time

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Full Moon
Full Moon

From The Old Farmer’s Almanac:
Full Moon Video
Each month, we will explain the traditional names of the full Moon along with some fascinating Moon facts. In this video, learn about the Full Worm Moon, Moon illusion, and when and why the Moon rides high or rides low. Click below to watch video.

Historically, the Native Americans who lived in the area that is now the northern and eastern United States kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to the recurring full Moons.

Each full Moon name was applied to the entire lunar month in which it occurred.

The Full Worm Moon was given its name by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior. At the time of this spring Moon, the ground begins to soften and earthworm casts reappear, inviting the return of robins. This is also known as the Sap Moon, as it marks the time when maple sap begins to flow and the annual tapping of maple trees begins.

OUT WEST

From Western Washington University:
American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year. Here [is the information from one tribe.]

Zuni – Southwest, New Mexico
According to WWU, in the Zuni language the name for March’s Moon is: “li’dekwakkya ts’ana” or “little sand storm.”

The Old Farmer’s Almanac

Western Washington University

The Full Cold Moon: December’s Moon, December 28 at 2:22 A.M. Pacific Time

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This Video narrated by Amy Nieskens is from The Old Farmer’s Almanac.

From The Old Farmer’s Almanac
Full Moon Names
December’s Full Moon is called the Full Cold Moon. It is the month when the winter cold fastens its grip and the nights become long and dark.

This full Moon is also called the Long Nights Moon by some Native American tribes.

From Western Washington University
American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year. Here are titles most closely associated with calendar months.

Here are two of those names:

Mali Keating Abenaki historian and storyteller
Mali Keating Abenaki historian and storyteller

Back East
Abenaki – Northeast, Maine
According to WWU, in the Abenaki language the name for December’s Moon is: “pebonkas” or “winter maker moon.”

Hopi Angel
Hopi Angel

Out West
Hopi – Southwest, Arizona
According to WWU, in the Hopi language the name for December’s Moon is: “kyaamuya” or “moon of respect.”

The Old Farmer’s Almanac
Western Washington University

November’s Full Moon on November 28th: The Full Beaver Moon

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November’s Full Moon – November 28 at 6:47 A.M. Las Vegas time.

This Video narrated by Amy Nieskens is from The Old Farmer’s Almanac

From The Old Farmer’s Almanac
Historically, the Native Americans who lived in the area that is now the northern and eastern United States kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to the recurring full Moons.

Each full Moon name was applied to the entire month in which it occurred. These names, and some variations, were used by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior.

November’s full Moon was called the Full Beaver Moon because it was the time to set traps, before the waters froze over. This Moon was also called the Full Frost Moon.

From Western Washington University
American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year. Here are two of those names:

Hopi House
Hopi House

OUT WEST
Hopi – Southwest, Arizona

According to WWU the Hopi word for November’s Moon is “kelmuya” or “moon of fledgling hawk.”

Longhouse
Northeastern Longhouse

BACK EAST
Passamaquoddy, Northeast U.S. – St. Croix River Region

According to WWU the Passamaquoddy word for November’s Moon is “kelotonuhket” or “freezing moon.”

The Old Farmer’s Almanac
Western Washington University
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The Full MOON in October is not just a rumor, it’s coming October 29: The Full Hunter’s Moon

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bongo69.wordpress.com
bongo69.wordpress.com

The Full MOON in October is not just a rumor, it’s coming October 29 at 1:50 P.M. Denver time: The Full Hunter’s Moon.

Video is from Old Farmer’s Almanac hosted by Amy Nieskens

October is the month of the Full Hunter’s Moon.
This was the time to hunt in preparation for winter. This full Moon is also called the Travel Moon and the Dying Grass Moon.

From Western Washington University:
American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year. Here are titles most closely associated with calendar months. [Two of those names are mentioned here]

Back East
Mohawk, Eastern Woodlands
According to WWU: in the Mohawk language the word for this month’s moon is, kentenha (time of poverty.)

Kateri Tekakwitha named first Native American saint in Vatican ceremony
By Claudio Lavanga, NBC News
VATICAN CITY – She was known as Lily of the Mohawks, or the Pocahontas of the Catholic Church. But on Sunday, Kateri Tekakwitha went down in history as the first Native American saint.
Born more than 300 years ago in the Mohawks village of Ossernion – today Ausierville, forty miles from Albany NY – she was one of seven people canonized by Pope Benedict XVI Sunday in an open-air ceremony held in Saint Peter’s Square. read more…

A statue of St. Kateri Tekakwitha in Auriesville, New York - Lucas Jackson / Reuters
A statue of St. Kateri Tekakwitha in Auriesville, New York - Lucas Jackson / Reuters

Out West
Zuni – Southwest, New Mexico
According to WWU: in the Zuni language the word for this month’s moon is, li’dekwakkwya lana (big wind moon.)

Wewha, a Zuni Lhamana (Two-Spirit), circa 1886.
We'wha, a Zuni Lhamana (Two-Spirit), circa 1886.

We’wha (1849–1896, various spellings) was a Zuni Native American from New Mexico. She was the most famous lhamana, a traditional Zuni gender role, now described as mixed-gender or Two-Spirit. Lhamana were men who lived in part as women, wearing a mixture of women’s and men’s clothing and doing a great deal of women’s work as well as serving as mediators read more…

The Old Farmer’s Almanac
Western Washington University
Visit the main pages of LasVegasBuffetClub.Com

Yes there will be another Full Moon, September 29: Full Corn Moon / Harvest Moon

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Harvest Moon, Credit: Robin Osbon
Harvest Moon, Credit: Robin Osbon

Yes there will be another Full Moon – September 29, 2012 at 8:18 P.M. Las Vegas time.

From The Old Farmer’s Almanac:
The Full Corn Moon corresponds with the time of harvesting corn. It is also called the Barley Moon, because it is the time to harvest and thresh the ripened barley.

This month, we also celebrate what we call a Harvest Moon, which is the full Moon nearest the autumnal equinox. It can occur in September or October and is bright enough to allow finishing all the harvest chores.

The Full Harvest Moon is different than all our other full Moons. Around this date, the Moon rises at almost the same time for a number of nights in our northern latitudes. Learn more in our article, Shine on Harvest Moon

From Western Washington University:
American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year. Here are titles most closely associated with calendar months. [Two of those names are mentioned here]

Back East
Mohawk, Eastern Woodlands
According to WWU: in the Mohawk language the word for this months moon is, seskhoko:wa (time of much freshness)

Out West
Tlingit, Pacific Northwest Coast
According to WWU: in the Tlingit language the word for this months moon is, dis yádi (big moon)

Shine on Harvest Moon, Ruth Etting
“This song was first introduced by Nora Bayes and songwriter-husband, Jack Norworth in the Ziegfeld Follies of 1908. Ruth Etting’s performance of the song in the Ziegfeld Follies of 1931 was a tribute to Nora Bayes. The 1931 production of the Follies was the last to be produced under the direction Florenz Ziegfeld, Jr.; he died shortly thereafter in 1932. It’s interesting to note that Nora Bayes recorded this song for Victor in 1910 but it was never released.”

I’ll be out there at the appropriate time looking at the Moon, will you?

The Old Farmer’s Almanac
Western Washington University
Visit the main pages of LasVegasBuffetClub.Com

Another Full Moon August 1, 2012

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Full Moon
Full Moon

There will be yet another Full Moon Aug 1, 2012, 9:27 P.M. Las Vegas time.

From the Old Farmer’s Almanac:
“Historically, the Native Americans who lived in the area that is now the northern and eastern United States kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to the recurring full Moons.”

August’s moon is called The Full Sturgeon Moon

“Each full Moon name was applied to the entire month in which it occurred. These names, and some variations, were used by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior.” read more about The Full Sturgeon Moon

“In August 2012, we will also enjoy a second full Moon on the 31st! The second full Moon in a month is commonly called a Blue Moon. This occurs about every 2.5 years.”

“Each month, we explain the names of the full Moon—plus, fascinating Moon facts:” The following video from The Old Farmer’s Almanac:

OUT WEST
Shoshone
Great Basin, Nevada, Wyoming
According to Western Washington University, the Shoshone word for August’s Moon is “guuteyai-mea'” meaning, “hot.”

BACK EAST
Mohawk
Eastern Woodlands
According to Western Washington University, The Mohawk word for August’s Moon is “seskehko:wa” meaning “time of freshness.”

Full Moon March 8, 2012

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Full Moon
Full Moon

The Moon will be 100% full on March 8, 2012 at 1:41 a.m. Las Vegas, time.

Watch this Moon video produced by The Old Farmer’s Almanac editors and staff:

The Old Farmer’s Almanac’s official website.

I subscribe to a Full Moon website that is offering a really cool thing. Light a candle in their “virtual sanctuary” and make a wish for your self or loved one. It’s free and you can remain anonymous.

Here’s a link: Full Moon wishing candles

More later…