Category Archives: FULL MOONS

May’s Full Flower Moon Will Be 100% Full At 12:15 A.M. (EDT) on Monday, May 16

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May's Full Moon
May’s Super Flower Full Moon and a Blood Moon Eclipse

May’s full Moon reaches its peak on May 15-16, 2022! Plus, this full Moon will be a supermoon and coincide with a total lunar eclipse for most of North America. Here’s everything you should know about this month’s full Moon, including how it came to be called the “Flower Moon.”

When to See the Full Moon in May 2022
May’s full Flower Moon reaches peak illumination at 12:15 A.M. (EDT) on Monday, May 16. This means that it will reach its peak on the night of Sunday, May 15, in more western time zones.

Why Is It Called the Flower Moon?
The full Moon names used by The Old Farmer’s Almanac come from a number of places, including Native American, Colonial American, and European sources. Traditionally, each full Moon name was applied to the entire lunar month in which it occurred, not solely to the full Moon. May’s Flower Moon name should be no surprise; flowers spring forth across North America in abundance this month!

“Flower Moon” has been attributed to Algonquin peoples, as confirmed by Christina Ruddy of The Algonquin Way Cultural Centre in Pikwakanagan, Ontario.

Beautiful Raven Haired Algonquin Woman
Beautiful Raven Haired Algonquin Woman

American Indian Tribes gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year.

Moon Names from Western Washington University

Algonquin tribe’s name for May’s full Moon: “suquanni kesos” translated as “when they set indian corn.”

Venture outdoors on the night of the 15th to get the best view of the bright full Flower Moon! Find a location with unobstructed views of the horizon, if possible. See what time the Moon will be visible in your area with our Moonrise and Moonset Calculator.

A “Blood Moon” Total Lunar Eclipse
This month’s full Moon coincides with a total lunar eclipse! A lunar eclipse occurs when Earth stands directly between the Moon and the Sun, which results in Earth casting its shadow on the Moon. During a total lunar eclipse, the Moon is fully obscured by Earth’s shadow, giving the Moon a reddish hue. This phenomenon is where the term “blood moon” comes from.

Full Moon Video for May, featuring Amy Neskiens

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The Full Worm Moon reaches peak illumination at 3:20 A.M. EDT on Friday, March 18, 2022.

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Full Moon
Full Moon

Full Worm Moon March

The full Worm Moon rises on Thursday and Friday night, March 17 and 18. What is a Worm Moon? Here are the real meaning and origins of March’s full Moon—and when you can see this Moon at its brightest!

March’s full Worm Moon reaches peak illumination at 3:20 A.M. EDT on Friday, March 18, 2022.

When to See the Full Moon in March 2022
The final full moon of the winter season will rise Thursday and Friday night. Specifically, March’s full Worm Moon reaches peak illumination at 3:20 A.M. EDT on Friday, March 18, 2022.

Of course, you don’t have to wait until the middle of the night! Look for the spectacularly bright Moon as it rises above the horizon on Thursday evening. If your weather is poor on Thursday night, try again! The Moon will also appear full Friday night. See when the Moon will be visible in your area.

If you have just a bit of rain on Thursday, March 17, you may even get to spot a rare phenomenon called a moonbow. A moonbow is just like a solar rainbow, but is created by moonlight (rather than sunlight) when it is refracted through water droplets in the air. Moonbows only happen when the full Moon is fairly low in the sky, so look for one in the hours after sunset when the sky is dark. Learn more about moonbows here!

This March Moon will look especially large to us when it’s near the horizon because of the “Moon illusion,” when it looks bigger when near comparative objects than it does when it’s high in the sky without any references.

Why Is It Called the Worm Moon?
The full Moon names used by The Old Farmer’s Almanac come from a number of places, including Native American, Colonial American, and European sources. Traditionally, each full Moon name was applied to the entire lunar month in which it occurred, not only to the full Moon.

Read more…

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Full Worm Moon Video

February’s Full Snow Moon: 11:59 A.M. February 16, 2022 EST

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Full Snow Moon
Full Snow Moon
From the Old Farmer’s Almanac:

“February’s Full Snow Moon reaches peak illumination at 11:59 A.M. EST on Wednesday, February 16. For the best view of this Moon, look for it that night or the night before; it will drift above the horizon in the east around sunset and reach its highest point in the sky around midnight. See when the Moon will be visible in your area.”

Watch a Video of the Full Snow Moon (below.)

“The full Moon names used by The Old Farmer’s Almanac come from a number of places, including Native American, Colonial American, and European sources. Traditionally, each full Moon name was applied to the entire lunar month in which it occurred, not just to the full Moon itself.”

The Snow Moon
The explanation behind February’s full Moon name is a fairly straightforward one: it’s known as the Snow Moon due to the typically heavy snowfall that occurs in February. On average, February is the United States’ snowiest month, according to data from the National Weather Service. In the 1760s, Captain Jonathan Carver, who had visited with the Naudowessie (Dakota), wrote that the name used for this period was the Snow Moon, “because more snow commonly falls during this month than any other in the winter.”

Names for this month’s Moon have historically had a connection to animals. The Cree traditionally called this the Bald Eagle Moon or Eagle Moon. The Ojibwe Bear Moon and Tlingit Black Bear Moon refer to the time when bear cubs are born. The Dakota also call this the Raccoon Moon, certain Algonquin peoples named it the Groundhog Moon, and the Haida named it Goose Moon.

Another theme of this month’s Moon names is scarcity. The Cherokee names of Month of the Bony Moon and Hungry Moon give evidence to the fact that food was hard to come by at this time.

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How to see the once-in-a-lifetime ‘Christmas comet’ this week

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by: Tracy Bloom, Nexstar Media Wire

Posted: Dec 21, 2021 / 09:43 AM CST / Updated: Dec 21, 2021 / 09:43 AM CST
From Fox 2 Now

(KTLA) – This time last year, skygazers were treated to the “Christmas Star,” when Jupiter and Saturn aligned and appeared the closest together from Earth’s vantage point in nearly 800 years.

Flash forward to the week of Dec. 20, 2021, and a “Christmas comet” is streaking through the evening sky.

Comet Leonard, or C/2021 as it is officially known, is the brightest comet of 2021. The celestial object actually made its closest approach to Earth on Dec. 12, when it was about 21 million miles away from our planet.

However, stargazers can still catch this once-in-a-lifetime sighting this week as it passes through the solar system, according to Gregory Leonard, a senior research specialist at the University of Arizona’s Lunar and Planetary Laboratory. Leonard first discovered the comet earlier this year, and it’s named after him. Read more…
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The Full Cold Moon will be 100% full December 18, 2021 at 11:37 PM EST

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Full Cold Moon
Full Cold Moon

Full Cold Moon information is from Almanac.Com

December’s Cold Moon reaches peak illumination on Saturday, December 18, 2021, at 11:37 P.M. EST. December’s full Moon is most commonly known as the Cold Moon—a Mohawk name that conveys the frigid conditions of this time of year, when cold weather truly begins to grip us.

Bundle Up for December’s Full Cold Moon!

December’s full Cold Moon rises on Saturday, December 18, 2021! And it’s a “Micromoon.” Learn more about what the Cold Moon and what makes it special (click the link below.)

When to See December’s Full Moon
December’s Cold Moon reaches peak illumination on Saturday, December 18, 2021, at 11:37 P.M. EST (click the link below.)

Start looking for the full Moon just before sunset as it begins to peek above the horizon. To find the exact time that it will appear in your area, consult our Moonrise Calculator (click the link below.)

More about the Full Cold Moon…

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Full Cold Moon

There will be a Full Beaver Moon Nov 19 1:59 A.M. Mountain Time

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Full Beaver Moon
Full Beaver Moon
In 2021, November’s full Beaver Moon reaches peak illumination in the wee hours of Friday, November 19—so look up on Thursday night! In addition, the Beaver Moon will also be plunged into an eclipse Friday morning! Get more information including Full Moon rise times, why we call it a “Beaver” Moon, and best days by the Moon.

Some information is from The Old Farmer’s Almanac

The Beaver Moon reaches peak illumination in the early morning hours of Friday, November 19, at 3:59 A.M. EST. Of course, it will be very close to full the night before, so plan to look for it starting on Thursday, November 18, just after sunset!

Find out exactly what time the full Moon will appear above the horizon in your area with our Moonrise and Moonset Calculator.

See a Near-Total Lunar Eclipse

“This year, November’s Beaver Moon is accompanied by a partial lunar eclipse that will be just shy of total—98% of the Moon will be covered by Earth’s shadow at the height of the eclipse! During a lunar eclipse, the Moon, Sun, and Earth stand in a line with the Earth in the middle, causing the planet’s shadow to be cast onto the Moon. This gives the full Moon a reddish, coppery hue, as well as the nickname “Blood Moon.” But is this Moon truly a Blood Moon? Read more about what a Blood Moon is—and isn’t.”

“This near-total lunar eclipse will be visible from most of North America, reaching its maximum at approximately 4:00 A.M. Eastern Time on Friday, November 19. Be sure to convert to your local time zone to find out when to look for the eclipse!”

Why Is It Called the Beaver Moon?
For decades, the Almanac has referenced the monthly full Moons with names tied to early Native American, Colonial American, and European folklore. Traditionally, each full Moon name was applied to the entire lunar month in which it occurred and through all of the Moon’s phases—not only the full Moon.

Why the “Beaver” Moon? This is the time of year when beavers begin to take shelter in their lodges, having laid up sufficient stores of food for the long winter ahead. During the time of the fur trade in North America, it was also the season to trap beavers for their thick, winter-ready pelts.

Watch a video on November’s Beaver Moon

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The Full Hunter’s Moon will be 100% Full Oct 20 at 7:57 A.M. Pacific Time

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Full Moon
Full Moon
The Old Farmer’s Almanac – October’s Full Moon

“October’s full Moon appears on Wednesday, October 20, 2021. Learn how the Hunter’s Moon got its name—plus, see Moon phase dates, Best Days by the Moon, folklore, and more!”

THE HARVEST, THE HUNTER, AND THE EQUINOX
“For decades, the Almanac has referenced the monthly full Moons with names tied to early Native American, Colonial American, and European folklore. Traditionally, each full Moon name was applied to the entire lunar month in which it occurred and through all of the Moon’s phases—not only the full Moon.”

Well its not a Harvest Moon but since it’s mentioned in this post…
Here’s Harvest Moon by Neil Young

“The Harvest Moon and the Hunter’s Moon are unique in that they are not directly related to this folklore, nor necessarily restricted to a single month. Instead, they are tied to an astronomical event: the autumnal equinox”

WHEN TO SEE THE FULL MOON IN OCTOBER 2021
“The Hunter’s Moon will reach peak illumination at 10:57 A.M. Eastern Time on Wednesday, October 20. It will be below the horizon at this time, so we’ll have to wait until sunset to watch it take its place in the sky. Like September’s Harvest Moon, the Hunter’s Moon rises around the same time for several nights in a row, so start looking for it on Tuesday, October 19”

“As the Moon drifts over the horizon around sunset, it may appear larger and more orange—how perfect for the fall season! But don’t be fooled by the “Moon Illusion,” which makes the Moon appear bigger than it really is.”

“→ Want to know the exact time of moonrise in your location? Check out our Moonrise and Moonset Calculator!”

YouTube Video on The Hunter’s Moon with Amy Nieskens

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There will be a full Harvest Moon – September 20th – 4:54 PM Pacific time.

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harvest-moon

Some information is from The Old Farmer’s Almanac

Scroll down for Neal Young’s Harvest Moon

September’s full Harvest Moon reaches its peak on Monday, September 20, 2021. Learn how the Harvest Moon got its name—plus, see Moon phase dates, Best Days by the Moon, folklore, and more!

Find Harvest Moon information from The Old Farmer’s Almanac

WHEN TO SEE THE FULL MOON IN SEPTEMBER 2021
This year, look for September’s full Harvest Moon to rise in the southeast just after sunset on Monday, September 20—just two days before the fall equinox! This full Moon reaches peak illumination at 7:54 P.M. Eastern Time on the 20th.

WHY IS IT CALLED THE HARVEST MOON?
The full Moon names used by The Old Farmer’s Almanac come from a number of places, including Native American, Colonial American, and European sources. Traditionally, each full Moon name was applied to the entire lunar month in which it occurred and through all of the Moon’s phases—not only the full Moon. The Harvest Moon, however, is a bit different! Click Almanac link above for more information.

Here’s Neil Young with Harvest Moon

The Full Strawberry Moon – Thursday, June 24, 2021, at 2:40 PM ET

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Full Strawberry Moon
Full Strawberry Moon

The next full Moon will occur on Thursday, June 24, 2021, at 2:40 PM ET, and is known as the Strawberry Moon.

Old Farmer’s Almanac

Used by the Algonquin, Ojibwe, Dakota, and Lakota peoples, among others, this name came about because ripe strawberries were ready to be gathered at this time.

Similarly, Berries Ripen Moon is a Haida term. Blooming Moon (Anishinaabe) is indicative of the flowering season. The time for tending crops is indicated by Green Corn Moon (Cherokee) and Hoer Moon (Western Abenaki).

Eighteenth-century Captain Jonathan Carver wrote that Native Americans whom he had visited used the term Hot Moon.

The Tlingit used the term Birth Moon, referring to the time when certain animals are born in their region. Egg Laying Moon and Hatching Moon are Cree terms for this period.

Here’s a video on June’s Strawberry Moon, featuring Amy Nieskens

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