Super Blood Wolf Moon – 10:17 PM; January 20, 2019 Pacific Time

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The Full Moon for January 2019 reaches its peak on the 21st. Traditionally, this Moon was called the Full Wolf Moon. This year, we’ll also be treated to a total lunar eclipse and a Supermoon! Read about how this Moon got its name—plus, see more Moon facts and folklore.*

The Full Moon for January 2019 reaches its peak on the 21st. Traditionally, this Moon was called the Full Wolf Moon. This year, we’ll also be treated to a total lunar eclipse and a Supermoon! Read about how this Moon got its name—plus, see more Moon facts and folklore.

THE “SUPER BLOOD WOLF MOON” ECLIPSE

This year, thanks to the Moon being both a Supermoon and part of a total lunar eclipse, January’s Full Wolf Moon is being called the “Super Blood Wolf Moon.” How’s that for a name?

Total Lunar Eclipse (“Blood Moon”)
Just a few hours before the peak of the full Moon, a total lunar eclipse will be visible from all of North, Central, and South America.

  • The partial eclipse begins at approximately 10:33 P.M. EST (7:33 P.M.PST) on January 20.
  • The total eclipse begins about an hour later, at 11:41 P.M. EST (8:41 P.M. PST), and will last for approximately one hour. This is the time to look skyward!*

A lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes into the shadow of the Earth, which causes the usually bright full Moon to turn a dark, ominous, coppery-red (giving the eclipsed Moon the nickname ”Blood Moon”).

Supermoon
In addition to a total lunar eclipse, we’ll also be treated to a Supermoon. A Supermoon occurs when the Moon is both full AND reaches the point in its orbit where it’s closest to Earth. A Supermoon is ever-so-slightly larger and brighter than a typical full Moon, though the difference is negligible when viewed with the naked eye.

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YOUR GUIDE TO THE NATIONAL WESTERN STOCK SHOW 2019

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YOUR GUIDE TO THE NATIONAL WESTERN STOCK SHOW 2019
YOUR GUIDE TO THE NATIONAL WESTERN STOCK SHOW 2019

Colorado.OurCommunityNow.com/

Kristina, Managing Editor

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The National Western Stock Show is back and bigger than ever!

“The National Western Stock Show has been a staple in the agricultural community since it made its debut in 1906. This 16-day event is one of Denver’s biggest draws for tourists and is considered to be the premier livestock, rodeo, and horse show in the nation! And last year, the Stock Show had its second-highest attendance of all time!”

This year’s events will be held from Saturday, January 12, to Sunday, January 27, at the National Western Complex.

Now, there are many reasons to attend the National Western Stock Show, including the action-packed shows as well as the massive trade show. But, my personal favorite has to be the livestock. Not only is the National Western Stock home to one of the world’s largest cattle shows, but there’s also the opportunity for the younger kiddos to compete and win prize money.

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Courtesy of the National Western Stock Show (Facebook)
Courtesy of the National Western Stock Show (Facebook)

Seriously, the Stock Show is full of incredible events for folks of all ages, but there’s a ton of ’em — and ain’t nobody got time for that! So, instead of listing every single one, you can simply view the full schedule of events here.

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Regular grounds admission, which ranges from $3-$22 per person, will get you access to the stockyards, the trade show, and a bunch of other fun events. However, events like Bull Riding and the Pro Rodeo will cost extra. You can purchase tickets online.

For information, visit the National Western Stock Show website!

Will you be attending the Stock Show this year? If so, which event are you the most excited about? Let us know in the comments below.

For information, visit the National Western Stock Show website!

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Dueling eclipses, and more top sky-watching events in January

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PUBLISHED 

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Early January will bring a partial solar eclipse for some lucky sky-watchers in Asia, like this one seen over China in August 2018.
Early January will bring a partial solar eclipse for some lucky sky-watchers in Asia, like this one seen over China in August 2018.

Ring in the new year with a sparkling meteor shower, a pair of eclipses, and a planet parade.

THE NEW YEAR starts off with a bang thanks to 2019’s best celestial fireworks show, followed by eye-catching planetary encounters and an eerie wolf moon eclipse.

So, if your holiday haul included new binoculars or telescopes, mark your January calendar and get ready to try out your stargazing gear!

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Earth at perihelion—January 3

If you ever thought Earth’s orbital distance from the sun controlled the temperature, this day should convince you otherwise. Earth’s path around the sun is not a perfect circle, and the planet gets nearer and farther from the star over the course of a year.

At 12:20 a.m. ET on the 3rd, our planet will reach its closest point to the sun for all of 2019. At this so-called perihelion, the two bodies will be just over 91 million miles apart—three percent closer than they will be at their farthest point, or aphelion, in July.

New Year meteor shower—January 3-4

In the predawn hours of January 4, the first meteor shower of the year, the Quadrantids, will reach its peak. Rates this morning will range from 60 to 120 shooting stars an hour when seen from a dark location. This year, a waning crescent moon should provide ideal conditions for seeing even faint meteors under clear skies.

The meteors will appear to radiate from the northeast sky, just off the handle of the Big Dipper. This is the site of Quadrans Muralis, a constellation that’s no longer recognized by astronomers but which gave the Quadrantids their name.
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Partial solar eclipse—January 5-6

For some lucky sky-watchers, the year’s first new moon will seem to take a bite out of the sun. The partial solar eclipse will begin at sunrise in Asia, starting in China at 7:34 a.m. local time (23:34 UT on January 5) and moving across Japan, Korea, and Russia. Four-and-a-half hours later, it will cross Alaska’s Aleutian Islands at local sunset (3:48 UT on January 6). People in the Americas, Africa, and Europe will unfortunately miss the sky show.

Read More at NationalGeographic.com/