Django Reinhardt & Stéphane Grappelli – Jattendrai Swing 1939 – LIVE!

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“Jean Reinhardt (23 January 1910 – 16 May 1953), known to all by his Romani nickname Django (French: [dʒãŋɡo ʁɛjnaʁt] or [dʒɑ̃ɡo ʁenɑʁt]), was a Belgian-born Romani-French jazz guitarist and composer. He was the first major jazz talent to emerge from Europe and remains the most significant.”

“With violinist Stéphane Grappelli,[] Reinhardt formed the Paris-based Quintette du Hot Club de France in 1934. The group was among the first to play jazz that featured the guitar as a lead instrument.[] Reinhardt recorded in France with many visiting American musicians, including Coleman Hawkins and Benny Carter, and briefly toured the United States with Duke Ellington’s orchestra in 1946. He died suddenly of a stroke at the age of 43.”

“Reinhardt’s most popular compositions have become standards within gypsy jazz, including “Minor Swing”,[] “Daphne”, “Belleville”, “Djangology”, “Swing ’42”, and “Nuages”. Jazz guitarist Frank Vignola claims that nearly every major popular-music guitarist in the world has been influenced by Reinhardt.[6] Over the last few decades, annual Django festivals have been held throughout Europe and the U.S., and a biography has been written about his life.[] In February 2017, the Berlin International Film Festival held the world premiere of the French film Django.”
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Press Release: The 115th National Western Stock Show postponed until January 2022

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Press Release: The 115th National Western Stock Show postponed until January 2022

In News by Karen Woods 

Denver, CO – The Western Stock Show Association (WSSA) Board of Directors together with the National Western Stock Show (NWSS) management, has made the difficult decision to postpone the 115th National Western Stock Show by one year and to resume the event in January 2022.

The COVID-19 pandemic does not allow for the Stock Show to host the annual event and comply with the health and safety guidelines that are necessary to protect  Coloradans and help stop the spread. More importantly, the projected environment through to the end of the year is too uncertain and therefore not reassuring enough to allow a traditional Stock Show to take place without potentially compromising the health and safety of exhibitors, visitors, and the public at large.

“The decision to postpone the 2021 Stock Show is incredibly difficult for our Board of Directors, staff, volunteers, business partners and the City and County of Denver,” stated Doug Jones, Chairman of the WSSA, “but the iconic western events and traditions we all know and love will be back in 2022, stronger than ever,” added Jones.

“Over the past several months, we reviewed and exhausted every option possible to host our event including a modified show with reduced capacity,” said Paul Andrews, President and CEO of the NWSS. “Ultimately, the health and safety of our guests, exhibitors, volunteers, and staff is of top priority and the NWSS and the City of Denver could not find a path forward to have Stock Show and comply with the rules that govern gatherings of our size and rules of social distancing,” said Andrews.

Stock Show management made the early decision due to the intense planning and expenses that go into the NWSS. “We needed to make sure we announced early enough so all the livestock producers, contestants, competitors, and exhibitors do not incur time and cost they can’t recover,” stated Andrews, “and as an indoor event in the heart of winter, we had to consider the virus could be spread more easily indoors, potentially compromising the safety and health of thousands of people. The responsible decision was to postpone the show.”

Every January, the NWSS hosts the super bowl of livestock shows along with professional rodeo competition and horse shows that are celebrated globally. The trade show is the largest western trade show in Colorado with nearly 900 booth spaces throughout the 90-acre grounds. The Stock Show draws over 700,000 attendees during the 16 days in January with record days seeing over 65,000 guests on site. The NWSS drives an economic impact of nearly 120 million dollars in January alone. The show supports 4-H and FFA partnerships that span more than a century and supports over 100 students annually studying in the fields of agriculture and rural medicine at dozens of colleges throughout Colorado and Wyoming. All of this as a non-profit 501(c)(3).

“We would like to thank our loyal stock show fans that are standing by us through this unprecedented time in history,” said Andrews. “We look forward to celebrating the return of Stock Show in 2022 with the grand opening of the historic Yards and Stockyards Event Center. Mark your calendars for January 8th through the 23rd, 2022,” said Andrews.

About the National Western Stock Show
Established in 1906, the National Western Stock Show is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization that provides college and graduate-level scholarships in agricultural science, business, and rural medicine. It is our mission to serve producers and consumers throughout the world by being the premier annual livestock show and center for year-round events. The 16-day show in January also serves as an entertainment arena, hosting one of the world’s richest regular season professional rodeos, world-class horse shows, family, educational events, and Colorado’s largest western trade show. For more information, visit nationalwestern.com.

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Frank Sinatra- I’ve got you under my skin

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This is, I think, the best live version. I love when he exclaims -after a rising crescendo, about 2:01 into the song- “Run for cover – run and hide!”

Here are two more versions, also great arrangements, etc.

“I’ve Got You Under My Skin” is a song written by Cole Porter in 1936. It was introduced that year in the Eleanor Powell musical film Born to Dance in which it was performed by Virginia Bruce. It was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Original Song that year.

It became a signature song for Frank Sinatra, and, in 1966, became a top 10 hit for the Four Seasons.
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