Tag Archives: Algonquin

June 17th Full Strawberry Moon 4:31 am Eastern Time

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Full Moon
Full Moon

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The Full Moon – The Full Strawberry Moon – in June will be on June 17th  4:31 am Eastern Time

Full Strawberry Moon – June This name was universal to every Algonquin tribe. However, in Europe they called it the Rose Moon. Also because the relatively short season for harvesting strawberries comes each year during the month of June . . . so the full Moon that occurs during that month was christened for the strawberry!

Full Moon names date back to Native Americans of North America. Tribes kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full Moon. Full Moon names were applied to the entire month in which each occurred. There was some variation in the full Moon names, but in general, the same ones were consistent among regional tribes. European settlers followed that custom and created some of their own names. Here is the Farmers Almanac’s list of the full Moon names: https://www.farmersalmanac.com/full-moon-names

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FarmersAlmanac.com/

 

The Full Strawberry Moon will be on Monday – June 20, 2016 at 4:04 A.M. Pacific Time

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June Strawberry Moon
June Strawberry Moon

The Full Strawberry Moon will be on Monday – June 20, 2016 at 4:04 A.M. Pacific Time

From Almanac.com

The month of June’s Full Moon’s name is the Full Strawberry Moon. June’s Full Strawberry Moon got its name because the Algonquin tribes knew it as a signal to gather ripening fruit. It was often known as the Full Rose Moon in Europe (where strawberries aren’t native) and the Honey Moon. See ALL Full Moon names and their meanings.From Almanac.com

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Watch Almanac.Com Video on June’s Full Strawberry Moon
With Amy Nieskens

FULL MOON FOR JUNE RISES ON THE SUMMER SOLSTICE!
“This June, 2016, the solstice and full Moon coincide—a rare event, indeed, that hasn’t happened in nearly 70 years. The event will be broadcast LIVE from Slooh’s observatory in the Canary Islands, and Almanac editors will co-host the event. Click here to see the Full Moon Summer Solstice show for free.”

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Almanac.com

November’s Full Moon on November 28th: The Full Beaver Moon

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November’s Full Moon – November 28 at 6:47 A.M. Las Vegas time.

This Video narrated by Amy Nieskens is from The Old Farmer’s Almanac

From The Old Farmer’s Almanac
Historically, the Native Americans who lived in the area that is now the northern and eastern United States kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to the recurring full Moons.

Each full Moon name was applied to the entire month in which it occurred. These names, and some variations, were used by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior.

November’s full Moon was called the Full Beaver Moon because it was the time to set traps, before the waters froze over. This Moon was also called the Full Frost Moon.

From Western Washington University
American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year. Here are two of those names:

Hopi House
Hopi House

OUT WEST
Hopi – Southwest, Arizona

According to WWU the Hopi word for November’s Moon is “kelmuya” or “moon of fledgling hawk.”

Longhouse
Northeastern Longhouse

BACK EAST
Passamaquoddy, Northeast U.S. – St. Croix River Region

According to WWU the Passamaquoddy word for November’s Moon is “kelotonuhket” or “freezing moon.”

The Old Farmer’s Almanac
Western Washington University
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EXTREME SUPERMOON will be 100% full Mar 19 at 11:10 A.M.

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Extreme SuperMoon
Extreme SuperMoon

First posted March 9, 2011
Will March 19 ‘supermoon’ trigger disasters?
At least one astrologer thinks quakes, eruptions and huge storms possible

By Natalie Wolchover – Space.Com

On March 19, the moon will swing around Earth more closely than it has in the past 18 years, lighting up the night sky from just 221,567 miles away. On top of that, it will be full. And one astrologer believes it could inflict massive damage on the planet.

Richard Nolle, a noted astrologer who runs the website astropro.com, has famously termed the upcoming full moon at lunar perigee (the closest approach during its orbit) an “extreme supermoon.” read more…

The EXTREME SUPERMOON will be 100% full Mar 19, 11:10 A.M. Las Vegas time.

“American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year. Here are titles most closely associated with calendar months” – more from Western Washington University…

Native American woman in buckskin
Native American woman in buckskin

Back East
Algonquin (Northeast to Great Lakes) word for March’s full Moon, according to WWU is: “namossack kesos” or “catching fish.”

Hopi potter
Hopi potter

Out West
Hopi (Southwest Arizona) term for March’s full Moon, according to WWU is: “osomuyaw” or “moon of the whispering wind.” I personally love this phrase. BC

From The Old Farmer’s Almanac
Historically, the Native Americans who lived in the area that is now the northern and eastern United States kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to the recurring full Moons.

Each full Moon name was applied to the entire month in which it occurred. These names, and some variations, were used by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior.

According to The Old Farmer’s Almanac, the name for March’s full Moon is: Full Worm Moon. At the time of this spring Moon, the ground begins to soften and earthworm casts reappear, inviting the return of robins. This is also known as the Sap Moon, as it marks the time when maple sap begins to flow and the annual tapping of maple trees begins – no Native word is given.

Find more Full Moon Info/sign-up to receive full Moon notifications each month at FullMoon.Info
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Full Moon October 22, 2010

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Adobe Moon in the City
Adobe Moon in the City

Yet another Full Moon October 22, 2010 at 9:38 P.M. Las Vegas time.

FULL MOON NAMES from The Old Farmer’s Almanac
Historically, the Native Americans who lived in the area that is now the northern and eastern United States kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to the recurring full Moons.

Each full Moon name was applied to the entire month in which it occurred. These names, and some variations, were used by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior.

This is the month when the leaves are falling and the game is fattened. Now is the time for hunting and laying in a store of provisions for the long winter ahead. October’s Moon is also known as the Travel Moon and the Dying Moon.

The following information and photos are from Western Washington University:

BACK EAST
In the Algonquin (Northeast to Great Lakes) language the name for the October full moon is: “pepewarr” or “white frost on grass.”

Algonquin mask
Algonquin mask

OUT WEST
In the Lakota (Northern Plains) language the name for the October full moon is: “canwape kasna wi” or “moon when the wind shakes off leaves.”

Lakota woman
Lakota woman

Interesting factoids:
Can the Moon change your luck? According to Moon folklore, in many cases it brings good luck. But not always! Read on . . .
It’s Lucky to . . .
It is lucky to see the first sliver of a new Moon “clear of the brush,” or unencumbered by foliage.
It is lucky to own a rabbit’s foot, especially if the rabbit was killed in a cemetery by a cross-eyed person at the dark of the Moon.
It is lucky to hold a moonstone in your mouth at the full Moon; it will reveal the future.
It is lucky to have a full Moon on the “Moon day” (Monday).
It is lucky to expose your newborn to the waxing Moon. It will give the baby strength.
It is lucky to move into a new house during the new Moon; prosperity will increase as the Moon waxes.
It’s Unlucky to . . .read more from The Old Farmer’s Almanac

Full Moon names/information from The Old Farmer’s Almanac
Full Moon names from WWU
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Full Moon on June 26th + Partial Eclipse

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Adobe Moon In The City
*Adobe Moon In The City Poster
c.2010 LasVegasBuffetClub

The Moon will be 100% full June 26, 2010 at 4:31 A.M. Las Vegas time.

From Western Washington University:
“American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year. Here are titles most closely associated with calendar months.”

Back East
In the Algonquin (Northeast to Great Lakes) language the name for the June full moon is: “twowa kesos” or “when they hill indian corn.”

Algonquin Woman and Child
Algonquin Woman and Child

Out West
In the Zuni (Southwest, New Mexico) language the name for June’s full moon is: “ik’ohbu yachunne” or “turning moon.”

Zuni Girl
Zuni Woman

Access the WWU website for Native full moon names and other infromation

“The full moon occurs when the Sun and Moon are located on opposite sides of the Earth. In this situation, the face of the Moon visible from the Earth is completely illuminated by the Sun. More specifically, the full moon occurs when the geocentric apparent longitudes of the Sun and the Moon are 180 degrees apart. This is a fancy way of saying that the Sun and the Moon are on opposite sides of the sky.”
read more interesting moon facts from Universe Today

Partial Lunar Eclipse Coming On June 26 by Joe Rao
“Two weeks before a total eclipse of the sun crosses over the South Pacific Ocean, the moon will put on a sky show of its own — a partial lunar eclipse on June 26 that should be visible from parts of North America, weather permitting.”

“The lunar eclipse will occur in the early morning hours of Saturday, June 26 as the moon crosses through the southern portion of Earth’s shadow in the constellation Sagittarius. At least some of this interesting event will be visible from western and central North America” read more from Space.Com

More eclipse information from TheSpiritualEclectic.Com
“It’s Eclipse Week here at The Spiritual Eclectic, so watch for more articles this week on how this eclipse will affect you.”
But first, the basics.
Time and Date:
June 26, 2010; 6:31 AM Central (here in NW Florida) more from TheSpiritualEclectic.Com

*Adobe Moon In The City Poster available for purchase.

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The “Moon When The Wolves Run Together” 100% full at 2:30 EST, December 2, 2009

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The LasVegasBuffetClub's Adobe Moon In The City poster
The LasVegasBuffetClub's
Adobe Moon In The City poster

The Moon When The Wolves Run Together will be 100% full at 2:32 a.m. (EST) on December 2, 2009.

*Depending on the source and geographical location the full moon on December 2, 2009 is called one or more of the following: Full Cold Moon, Snow Moon or Moon When The Wolves Run Together.

Out West

Cherokee Woman - Western Washington University image
Beautiful Cherokee Woman
Western Washington University image

“American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year.”

The December moon is called “vskihyi” in the Cherokee language or “Snow Moon,” according to WWU.

This is Western Washington University’s list of Native American Full Moon names.

Back East

ABENAKI ART - WWU image
ABENAKI ART - WWU image

Full Moon names date back to Native Americans, of what is now the northern and eastern United States. The tribes kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full Moon. Their names were applied to the entire month in which each occurred. There was some variation in the Moon names, but in general, the same ones were current throughout the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior. European settlers followed that custom and created some of their own names. Since the lunar month is only 29 days long on the average, the full Moon dates shift from year to year. Following is the Farmers Almanac’s list of the full Moon names. (See Western Washington University’s list above)

FULL COLD MOON – This is the month when the winter cold fastens its grip and the nights become long and dark. This full Moon is also called the Long Nights Moon by some Native American tribes.

The [c.2009-Adobe Moon in the City] poster is available for purchase. The full moon in this poster was photographed in Las Vegas in the 90s. The image was inserted into it’s “frame” with a Photoshop type application. The poster is 24″x36″.

*Full Beaver Moon on November 2, 2009

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Adobe Moon in the City
Adobe Moon in the City
click for larger image

*Depending on the source and geographical location the full moon on November 2, 2009 is called one or more of the following: Full Beaver Moon, Full Hunters Moon or Heading to Winter Moon.
The full moon on November 2 will be 100% full at 11:15 P.M. Las Vegas time.

Out West

Comanche Arrowhead
Comanche Arrowhead

“American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year.”

In the Comanche (Southern Plains) language, the November Full Moon is “yubaubi mua” – “Heading to Winter Moon.”

Here is Western Washington University’s list of Native American Full Moon names.

Back East

algonquin_art_thumb

Full Moon names date back to Native Americans, of what is now the northern and eastern United States. The tribes kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full Moon. Their names were applied to the entire month in which each occurred. There was some variation in the Moon names, but in general, the same ones were current throughout the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior. European settlers followed that custom and created some of their own names. Since the lunar month is only 29 days long on the average, the full Moon dates shift from year to year. Here is the Farmers Almanac’s list of the full Moon names.

Full Beaver Moon – November This was the time to set beaver traps before the swamps froze, to ensure a supply of warm winter furs. Another interpretation suggests that the name Full Beaver Moon comes from the fact that the beavers are now actively preparing for winter. It is sometimes also referred to as the Frosty Moon.

The [c.2009-Adobe Moon in the City] poster is available for purchase. The full moon in this poster was photographed in Las Vegas in the 90s. The image was inserted into it’s “frame” with a Photoshop type application. The poster is 24″x36″.

Visit the main pages of LasVegasBuffetClub.com

Full Moon – August 5: (The) Full Harvest Moon

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Adobe Moon in the City
Adobe Moon in the City
click for larger image

Time for another Full Moon! The moon will be 100% full August 5, 2009 at 5:56 P.M. Las Vegas time.

zuni_art_thumb

OUT WEST:
“American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year. Here are titles most closely associated with calendar months” read more from The Western Washington University Planetarium Website

According to Western Washington University, The Comanche of the Southern Plains refer to this August (5th) Full Moon as: “tahma mua” or summer moon (click the WWU link above for more information.)

algonquin_art_thumb

Back East:
“Historically the Native Americans who lived in the area that is now the northern and eastern United States kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to the recurring full Moons. Each full Moon name was applied to the entire month in which it occurred. These names, and some variations, were used by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior.” read more from The Old Farmer’s Almanac

The full Moon name for this month is Full Sturgeon Moon. Some Native American tribes knew that the sturgeon of the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain were most readily caught during this full Moon. Others called it the Green Corn Moon or the Grain Moon.”

Astrologically speaking:
Full Moon in Aquarius, By Molly Hall at About.com
“This year’s Aquarius Full Moon is on August 5/6, depending on your time zone, and is preceded by a penumbral (partial) lunar eclipse. The lunar eclipse is exact August 5th, at 8:39 pm EDT, with the full Moon exact at 8:55 pm EDT.” read more from Molly Hall at About.com

The [c.2009-Adobe Moon in the City] poster is available for purchase. The full moon in this poster was photographed in Las Vegas in the 90s. The image was inserted into it’s “frame” with a Photoshop type application. The poster is 24″x36″.

Visit the main pages of LasVegasBuffetClub.com

“FULL BUCK MOON” July 7th, 2009

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amitc-neon4x3 …click for larger image *This is the “Adobe Moon in the City” poster.

The “FULL BUCK MOON” will be 100% full at 2:22 a.m. July 7, 2009, Las Vegas time.

OUT WEST

“American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year. Here are titles most closely associated with calendar months” read more from The Western Washington University Planetarium Website

In the Zuni language, the name for The July [7] Moon is: “dayamcho yachunne” (“when limbs of trees are broken by fruit.”)

The Zuni Tribe of Southwestern New Mexico

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BACK EAST

“Historically the Native Americans who lived in the area that is now the northern and eastern United States kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to the recurring full Moons. Each full Moon name was applied to the entire month in which it occurred. These names, and some variations, were used by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior.” read more from The Old Farmer’s Almanac

The Full Buck Moon “The full Moon name for this month is Full Buck Moon. Bucks begin to grow new antlers at this time. This full Moon was also known as the Thunder Moon, because thunderstorms are so frequent during this month.”

[Both of the above sites seem to disagree on the official moon names. Just pick one!]

“Here is the chart for the Full Moon in Capricorn, exact on July 7th at 5:21 am EDT, followed by a penumbral (partial) lunar eclipse at 5:38 am EDT.” read more from About.com… This is an insightful perspective from an astrologer. [Variances in FM times are due to geographical differences.]

*The [c.2009-Adobe Moon in the City] poster is available for purchase. The full moon in this poster was photographed in Las Vegas in the 90s. The image was inserted into it’s “frame” with a Photoshop type application. The poster is 24″x36″.

View our blog post on The Man In the Moon, from November, 2007.

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