Tag Archives: Full Buck Moon

There will be a FULL BUCK MOON July 4, at 10:44 P.M. Mountain Time

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FULL BUCK MOON
FULL BUCK MOON

Forget the fireworks! This year, watch the full Buck Moon rise on the 4th of July instead! Find out why July’s full Moon is called the Buck Moon and learn about the penumbral eclipse that will occur on this date.

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WHEN TO SEE THE FULL MOON IN JULY 2020

Full Buck Moon on the 4th

July’s full Moon will rise after sunset in the evening of Saturday, July 4, before reaching peak illumination at 12:44 A.M. Eastern Time on Sunday, July 5. Look towards the southeast to watch it rise above the horizon.  How fun for our bright satellite to join Independence Day fireworks in the night sky!

Consult our Moonrise and Moonset Calculator to see when the Buck Moon will be visible in your area!

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WHY IS IT CALLED THE FULL BUCK MOON?

Traditionally, the full Moon in July is called the Buck Moon because a buck’s antlers are in full growth mode at this time. This full Moon was also known as the Thunder Moon because thunderstorms are so frequent during this month.

The tradition of naming Moons is rich in history. Here at The Old Farmer’s Almanac, we have long honored the Native American Moon names and the folklore of those who came before us. We follow the full Moon names that were used during Native American and Colonial times to help track the seasons—usually by the Algonquin people who were prominent along the Atlantic Coast and into the interior along the St. Lawrence River and around the Great Lakes.

See all Full Moon names and their meanings.

Watch (Very) Closely for a Penumbral Eclipse

Like last month, this month’s full Moon brings with it a penumbral eclipse, which occurs when the Moon crosses through the faint outer edge of Earth’s shadow (the penumbra), making part of the Moon appear ever-so-slightly darker than usual. Unlike a full lunar or solar eclipse, the visual effect of a penumbral eclipse is usually so minimal that it can be difficult to perceive at all. For this eclipse, only a small portion of the Moon will cross into the penumbra, making it even more difficult to see.

This eclipse will be visible from most of North America, except in the northernmost regions of Canada and Alaska. It will begin at 11:04 P.M. EDT (8:04 P.M. PDT) on July 4 and end at 1:56 A.M. EDT on July 5 (10:56 P.M. PDT on July 4).

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Full Buck Moon July 27 at 1:22 P.M. Pacific Time

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This information is from The Old Farmer's Almanac
JULY FULL BUCK MOON

Farmer’s Almanac “Native Americans’ Full Moon names were created to help different tribes track the seasons. Think of it as a “nickname” for the Moon! See our list of other full Moon names for each month of the year and their meanings.”

FULL BUCK MOON

JULY FULL MOON NAMES
July is the month of the Full Buck Moon. At this time, a buck’s antlers are in full growth mode. This Full Moon was also known as the Thunder Moon because thunderstorms are so frequent during this month.

How did the Full Moons get their names? The Full Moons have descriptive names that come from Native American tribes who used the Full Moons as a sort of calendar to keep track of the seasons. The Almanac tends to use the names of the Algonquins who were prominent along the Atlantic Coast and into the interior along the St. Lawrence River and around the Great Lakes.

See all Full Moon names and their meanings.

JULY’S FULL BUCK MOON VIDEO
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TOTAL LUNAR ECLIPSE 2018: A BLOOD MOON?

This year, a total lunar eclipse will occur with the full Moon on July 27. However, this eclipse won’t be visible from the U.S. or Canada. (The next total lunar eclipse visible in North America will occur in January 2019—not too far off!) See our eclipse page for more information.

For sky watch buffs, it may be interesting to know that this is the longest total lunar eclipse of the 21st century. From start to finish, the event will last four hours, with the totality lasting 1 hour and 43 minutes.  You’ll hear some media outlets call this event the “Blood Moon” Eclipse. This is an increasingly popular name used for a total lunar eclipse, but is not an official, scientific term. Put simply, the fully-eclipsed Moon turns a red-orange, similar to a sunset color; with less direct sunlight hitting the Moon during the eclipse, you only see the reddish wave lengths.

Almanac.Com/
LasVegasBuffetClub.Com/

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Jul 27 at 1:22 P.M.

Full Buck Moon July 8 at 9:08 P.M. Las Vegas Time

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JULY FULL BUCK MOON
JULY FULL BUCK MOON

This information is from The Old Farmer’s Almanac

“Native Americans’ Full Moon names were created to help different tribes track the seasons. Think of it as a “nickname” for the Moon! See our list of other full Moon names for each month of the year and their meanings.”

*

JULY FULL MOON NAMES
July is the month of the Full Buck Moon. At this time, a buck’s antlers are in full growth mode. This Full Moon was also known as the Thunder Moon because thunderstorms are so frequent during this month.

How did the Full Moons get their names? The Full Moons have descriptive names that come from Native American tribes who used the Full Moons as a sort of calendar to keep track of the seasons. The Almanac tends to use the names of the Algonquins who were prominent along the Atlantic Coast and into the interior along the St. Lawrence River and around the Great Lakes.

See all Full Moon names and their meanings.
JULY’S FULL BUCK MOON VIDEO

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Almanac.Com/
LasVegasBuffetClub.Com/

“FULL BUCK MOON” July 7th, 2009

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amitc-neon4x3 …click for larger image *This is the “Adobe Moon in the City” poster.

The “FULL BUCK MOON” will be 100% full at 2:22 a.m. July 7, 2009, Las Vegas time.

OUT WEST

“American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year. Here are titles most closely associated with calendar months” read more from The Western Washington University Planetarium Website

In the Zuni language, the name for The July [7] Moon is: “dayamcho yachunne” (“when limbs of trees are broken by fruit.”)

The Zuni Tribe of Southwestern New Mexico

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BACK EAST

“Historically the Native Americans who lived in the area that is now the northern and eastern United States kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to the recurring full Moons. Each full Moon name was applied to the entire month in which it occurred. These names, and some variations, were used by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior.” read more from The Old Farmer’s Almanac

The Full Buck Moon “The full Moon name for this month is Full Buck Moon. Bucks begin to grow new antlers at this time. This full Moon was also known as the Thunder Moon, because thunderstorms are so frequent during this month.”

[Both of the above sites seem to disagree on the official moon names. Just pick one!]

“Here is the chart for the Full Moon in Capricorn, exact on July 7th at 5:21 am EDT, followed by a penumbral (partial) lunar eclipse at 5:38 am EDT.” read more from About.com… This is an insightful perspective from an astrologer. [Variances in FM times are due to geographical differences.]

*The [c.2009-Adobe Moon in the City] poster is available for purchase. The full moon in this poster was photographed in Las Vegas in the 90s. The image was inserted into it’s “frame” with a Photoshop type application. The poster is 24″x36″.

View our blog post on The Man In the Moon, from November, 2007.

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