Tag Archives: Full Moon

The Full Pink Moon Will Be 100% Full Monday April 26, 2021

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Almanac.Com

FullPinkMoon

April’s full Moon rises on the night of Monday, April 26. Traditionally called the Pink Moon, this full Moon will also be a spectacular supermoon! Here’s everything you should know about the Moon this month, including facts, folklore, and Moon phase dates.

WHEN TO SEE THE FULL MOON IN APRIL 2021

Venture outside on the night of Monday, April 26, to catch a glimpse of April’s full Pink Moon. This full Moon—which is the first of two supermoons this year—will be visible after sunset and reach peak illumination at 11:33 P.M. EDT.

For the best view of this lovely spring Moon, find an open area and watch as the Moon rises just above the horizon, at which point it will appear its biggest and take on a golden hue! (Find local Moon rise and set times here.)

SUPER PINK MOON: THE FIRST SUPERMOON OF THE YEAR

(Note: Before you get your hopes up, this “Super Pink Moon” won’t actually look “super pink”—or any hue of pink, really. The Moon will be its usual golden color near the horizon and fade to a bright white as it glides overhead!)

This year, we’ll be treated to two supermoons, with the first occurring on April 26 and the second on May 26. Supermoons are said to be bigger and brighter than your average full Moon.

Just how big and how bright, exactly? On average, supermoons are about 7% bigger and about 15% brighter than a typical full Moon. However, unless you were to see a regular full Moon and a supermoon side by side in the sky, the difference is very, very difficult to notice! Learn more about supermoons here.

WHY IS IT CALLED THE PINK MOON?

The full Moon names used by The Old Farmer’s Almanac come from a number of places, including Native American, Colonial American, and European sources. Traditionally, each full Moon name was applied to the entire lunar month in which it occurred, not only to the full Moon.

The Pink Moon

Although we wish this name had to do with the color of the Moon, the reality is not quite as mystical or awe-inspiring. In truth, April’s full Moon often corresponded with the early springtime blooms of a certain wildflower native to eastern North America: Phlox subulata—commonly called creeping phlox or moss phlox—which also went by the name “moss pink.”

Thanks to this seasonal association, this full Moon came to be called the “Pink” Moon!

Here’s a Pink Moon Video featuring Amy Neiskens from Almanac.com:

Read more…

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THE FULL WORM MOON Will Be 100% Full At 2:50 P.M. EDT on Sunday, March 28, 2021

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Full Worm Moon
Full Worm Moon

From The Old Farmer’s Almanac

March’s full Worm Moon reaches peak illumination at 2:50 P.M. EDT on Sunday, March 28, 2021.

Look for the spectacularly bright Moon as it rises above the horizon that evening! See when the Moon will be visible in your area.

This year, because it is the first full Moon to occur after the spring equinox on March 20, March’s full Moon is the Paschal Full Moon. This means that its date determines the date of Easter (April 4, 2021)! Read more about how Easter’s date is determined.

WHY IS IT CALLED THE WORM MOON?
The full Moon names used by The Old Farmer’s Almanac come from a number of places, including Native American, Colonial American, and European sources. Traditionally, each full Moon name was applied to the entire lunar month in which it occurred, not only to the full Moon.

The Worm Moon

March’s full Moon goes by the name Worm Moon, which was originally thought to refer to the earthworms that appear as the soil warms in spring. This invites robins and other birds to feed—a true sign of spring!

An alternative explanation for this name comes from Captain Jonathan Carver, an 18th-century explorer, who wrote that this Moon name refers to a different sort of “worm”—beetle larvae—which begin to emerge from the thawing bark of trees and other winter hideouts at this time.

Here’s a video on the Full Worm Moon from The Old Farmer’s Almanac, featuring Amy Nieskens:

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August’s Full Sturgeon Moon, will occur on Monday, August 3, 2020 at 9:59 AM Mountain Time

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THE FULL STURGEON MOON
THE FULL STURGEON MOON

Almanac.com / Full Moon August
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August’s full Sturgeon Moon reaches its peak on Monday, August 3, 2020. Learn how this month’s full Moon got such a peculiar name!

The Full Sturgeon Moon

August’s full Moon will appear on the night of Sunday, August 2, before reaching peak illumination at 11:59 A.M. Eastern Time on Monday, August 3. On either of these nights, look toward the southeast after sunset to catch a glimpse of the Sturgeon Moon rising!

Perseid Meteor Shower

Not too long after August’s full Moon, it will be time to keep an eye out for the annual Perseid meteor shower, which lasts from late July to late August. The meteors will reach their maximum in the hours just before dawn (while it’s still dark) between August 11 and 13! Thankfully, the Moon will be in its Last Quarter phase at this time, so the meteors shouldn’t be too washed out to view. Read more about the Perseid meteor shower here.
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August’s Full Sturgeon Moon Video:

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There will be a FULL BUCK MOON July 4, at 10:44 P.M. Mountain Time

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FULL BUCK MOON
FULL BUCK MOON

Forget the fireworks! This year, watch the full Buck Moon rise on the 4th of July instead! Find out why July’s full Moon is called the Buck Moon and learn about the penumbral eclipse that will occur on this date.

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WHEN TO SEE THE FULL MOON IN JULY 2020

Full Buck Moon on the 4th

July’s full Moon will rise after sunset in the evening of Saturday, July 4, before reaching peak illumination at 12:44 A.M. Eastern Time on Sunday, July 5. Look towards the southeast to watch it rise above the horizon.  How fun for our bright satellite to join Independence Day fireworks in the night sky!

Consult our Moonrise and Moonset Calculator to see when the Buck Moon will be visible in your area!

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WHY IS IT CALLED THE FULL BUCK MOON?

Traditionally, the full Moon in July is called the Buck Moon because a buck’s antlers are in full growth mode at this time. This full Moon was also known as the Thunder Moon because thunderstorms are so frequent during this month.

The tradition of naming Moons is rich in history. Here at The Old Farmer’s Almanac, we have long honored the Native American Moon names and the folklore of those who came before us. We follow the full Moon names that were used during Native American and Colonial times to help track the seasons—usually by the Algonquin people who were prominent along the Atlantic Coast and into the interior along the St. Lawrence River and around the Great Lakes.

See all Full Moon names and their meanings.

Watch (Very) Closely for a Penumbral Eclipse

Like last month, this month’s full Moon brings with it a penumbral eclipse, which occurs when the Moon crosses through the faint outer edge of Earth’s shadow (the penumbra), making part of the Moon appear ever-so-slightly darker than usual. Unlike a full lunar or solar eclipse, the visual effect of a penumbral eclipse is usually so minimal that it can be difficult to perceive at all. For this eclipse, only a small portion of the Moon will cross into the penumbra, making it even more difficult to see.

This eclipse will be visible from most of North America, except in the northernmost regions of Canada and Alaska. It will begin at 11:04 P.M. EDT (8:04 P.M. PDT) on July 4 and end at 1:56 A.M. EDT on July 5 (10:56 P.M. PDT on July 4).

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April’s full Pink Moon rises on the night of Tuesday, April 7

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SPOT THE SUPER PINK MOON: A SUPERMOON AND THE FIRST FULL MOON OF SPRING!
SPOT THE SUPER PINK MOON: A SUPERMOON AND THE FIRST FULL MOON OF SPRING!

Almanac.com, By The Editors*

April’s full Moon rises on the night of Tuesday, April 7. Traditionally called the Pink Moon, this full Moon will also be a spectacular supermoon! Here’s everything you should know about the Moon this month, including facts, folklore, and Moon phase dates.

WHEN TO SEE THE FULL MOON IN APRIL 2020

Venture outside on the night of Tuesday, April 7, to catch a glimpse of April’s full Pink Moon. This full Moon—which is a supermoon, the first full Moon of springand the Paschal Full Moon—will be visible after sunset and reach peak illumination at 10:35 P.M. EDT.

For the best view of this lovely spring Moon, find an open area and watch as the Moon rises just above the horizon, at which point it will appear its biggest and take on a golden hue! (Find local Moon rise and set times here.)

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SUPER PINK MOON: THE BIGGEST AND BRIGHTEST SUPERMOON OF THE YEAR

(Note: Before you get your hopes up, this “Super Pink Moon” won’t actually look “super pink”—or any hue of pink, really. The Moon will be its usual golden color near the horizon and fade to a bright white as it glides overhead. Learn why it’s called the Pink Moon below!)

We’re currently in the midst of a series of supermoons, with the first having occurred on March 9 and the last occurring on May 7. That makes April’s full Moon the second supermoon in this series, but certainly not the one to miss.

Thanks to the fact that April’s full Moon will be closer to Earth than either other supermoon in the series, it will be the biggest and brightest full Moon of 2020!

How big and how bright, exactly? On average, supermoons are about 7% bigger and about 15% brighter than a typical full Moon. However, unless you were to see a regular full Moon and a supermoon side by side in the sky, the difference is very difficult to notice. Learn more about supermoons here!

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The First Full Moon of Spring & the Paschal Full Moon

April’s full Moon is the first to occur after the March equinox, which makes it the first full Moon of spring and the Paschal Full Moon. The Paschal Full Moon is the full Moon that determines the date of Easter. Find out more about Easter and Paschal Full Moon here.

WHY IS IT CALLED THE PINK MOON?

Although we wish this name had to do with the color of the Moon, the reality is not quite as mystical or awe-inspiring. In truth, April’s full Moon often corresponded with the early springtime blooms of a certain wildflower native to eastern North America: Phlox subulata—commonly called creeping phlox or moss phlox—which also went by the name “moss pink.”

Thanks to this seasonal association, this full Moon came to be called the Pink Moon!

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Full Worm Moon: March 9, 2020, at 10:48 AM PT

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Full Moon
Full Moon

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From The Old Farmers Almanac.Com

Full Worm Moon – March “As the temperature begins to warm and the ground begins to thaw, earthworm casts appear, heralding the return of the robins. The more northern tribes knew this Moon as the Full Crow Moon, when the cawing of crows signaled the end of winter; or the Full Crust Moon, because the snow cover becomes crusted from thawing by day and freezing at night.’

‘The Full Sap Moon, marking the time of tapping maple trees, is another variation. To the settlers, it was also known as the Lenten Moon, and was considered to be the last full Moon of winter.”

Full Moon Names and Their Meanings

Historically, Native American and other traditional names for full Moons were used to track the seasons. Think of them as “nicknames” for the Moon! See Full Moon names for each month of the year and their meanings.
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The Old Farmers Almanac Full Worm Video

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Super Worm Moon: The First Supermoon of the Year

This full Moon will also be the first of three supermoons in 2020—the other two occurring on April 7 and May 7. Thanks to its supermoon status, this year’s Worm Moon has been named the Super Worm Moon!  Let’s just hope that the worms don’t take that to heart.

“Supermoon” is the popular nickname given to a full Moon that coincides with perigee, which is the point in the Moon’s orbit of Earth where it’s closest to our planet.

While at perigee, the full Moon appears a bit brighter and about 7% larger than a typical full Moon. However, don’t go out on the night of March 9 expecting to see a Moon that’s noticeably more massive. Unless you were to see them side by side, the differences between a supermoon and a regular full Moon can be very difficult to perceive!

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THE FULL SNOW MOON February 9th at 12:34 A.M. MT

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Full Moon
Full Moon

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From The Old Farmer’s Almanac:

“February’s full Moon, called the Full Snow Moon, reaches peak fullness at 2:34 A.M. EST on Sunday, February 9. For the best view of this Moon, look for it on the night of Saturday, February 8; it will rise in the east and reach its highest point in the sky around midnight.”

Check Out the Snow Moon, the First Supermoon of 2020

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“IS FEBRUARY’S FULL MOON A SUPERMOON?”

“You may hear February’s full Moon being called a supermoon. But is it really a supermoon? The answer is that it’s debatable, since it depends on which definition of supermoon you go by.”

“According to the broader definition of the term, which says that a supermoon is a full moon that coincides with the point in the Moon’s monthly orbit where it is closest to Earth, February’s full Moon could arguably be considered a supermoon by some, since the Moon will be closer than it normally is. By this definition, there are also supermoons in March, April, and May this year—all of which will be closer to Earth than February’s full Moon.”

“However, if we go by a stricter definition of supermoon, which says that a supermoon is the full moon that comes closest to Earth during the year, then April’s full Moon is the true supermoon of 2020.”

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June 17th Full Strawberry Moon 4:31 am Eastern Time

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Full Moon
Full Moon

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The Full Moon – The Full Strawberry Moon – in June will be on June 17th  4:31 am Eastern Time

Full Strawberry Moon – June This name was universal to every Algonquin tribe. However, in Europe they called it the Rose Moon. Also because the relatively short season for harvesting strawberries comes each year during the month of June . . . so the full Moon that occurs during that month was christened for the strawberry!

Full Moon names date back to Native Americans of North America. Tribes kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full Moon. Full Moon names were applied to the entire month in which each occurred. There was some variation in the full Moon names, but in general, the same ones were consistent among regional tribes. European settlers followed that custom and created some of their own names. Here is the Farmers Almanac’s list of the full Moon names: https://www.farmersalmanac.com/full-moon-names

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FarmersAlmanac.com/

 

THE FULL WORM MOON ON THE SPRING EQUINOX; Mar 20 6:43 P.M. Pacific Time

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THE FULL WORM MOON ON THE SPRING EQUINOX

In 2019, the full Moon of March rises the same day as the vernal equinox—marking the start of spring! How fitting for what we call the “Full Worm Moon.” March also brings the final supermoon of 2019. Here’s all you need to know.
In 2019, the full Moon of March rises the same day as the vernal equinox—marking the start of spring! How fitting for what we call the “Full Worm Moon.” March also brings the final supermoon of 2019. Here’s all you need to know.

In 2019, the full Moon of March rises the same day as the vernal equinox—marking the start of spring! How fitting for what we call the “Full Worm Moon.” March also brings the final supermoon of 2019. Here’s all you need to know.

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This is one of those rare years when the full Moon lands right smack on the spring equinox—on March 20, 2019, in North America. This only happens three times a century, on average. Plus, it’s the third and final “supermoon.” Enjoy the extra-bright equinox full moon Wednesday night!

Here’s a video, featuring Amy Nieskens

SUPER MOON ON THE SPRING EQUINOX

The March full Moon is particularly special because it reaches its peak on the same day as the spring equinox, on March 20, 2019. The last time the full Moon and the spring equinox coincided this closely (4 hours apart) was in March 2000, but the last time they occurred on the same date was on March 20, 1981!

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This full Moon is also a supermoon, meaning the Moon will be nearly at its closest to Earth for the month of March. It’s the year’s third (and final) of three straight full supermoons. This means that the Moon may “appear” brighter and bigger than normal, provided the night sky is clear and dark.

THE FULL MOON AND EASTER

Did you know: Easter Sunday (in the Western Christian Church) ​​​​is celebrated on the first Sunday after the full Moon that occurs on or just after the vernal equinox.

Since the full Moon AND the vernal equinox both fall on March 20 this year (in North America, at least), you might expect that Easter Sunday would be on the following Sunday, March 24.

However, for simplicity’s sake, the Church set a fixed date for the equinox, March 21. Additionally, the Church does not rely on the date of the astronomical full Moon, but rather the ecclesiastical full Moon, which occurs on the 14th day of the ecclesiastical lunar month. The date of the ecclesiastical full Moon may fall one to two days before the astronomical full Moon. Therefore, because the first full Moon after March 21 doesn’t occur until April 19 this year, Easter Sunday 2019 falls on Sunday, April 21!

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(This is not the first time the church’s “set” equinox and astronomy’s “moving” equinox affected Easter’s date; it last happened in 1981 and will happen again in 2038.)

Almanac.com/

LAS VEGAS BUFFET CLUB

The next full moon will occur on October 24th, 2018 at 9:47 AM PT and will be a Full Hunter’s Moon

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Full Moon
Full Moon

Full Hunter’s Moon

October This full Moon is often referred to as the Full Hunter’s Moon, Blood Moon, or Sanguine Moon. Many moons ago, Native Americans named this bright moon for obvious reasons. The leaves are falling from trees, the deer are fattened, and it’s time to begin storing up meat for the long winter ahead. Because the fields were traditionally reaped in late September or early October, hunters could easily see fox and other animals that come out to glean from the fallen grains. Probably because of the threat of winter looming close, the Hunter’s Moon is generally accorded with special honor, historically serving as an important feast day in both Western Europe and among many Native American tribes.
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THE HUNTER’S MOON MEANING
The Algonquin Native American tribes referred to October’s Moon as the Full Hunter’s Moon because time to go hunting in preparation for winter. Since the harvesters have reaped the fields, hunters can easily see the fattened deer and other animals that have come out to glean (and the foxes that have come out to prey on them).

The earliest use of the term “Hunter’s Moon” cited in the Oxford English Dictionary is from 1710. Some sources suggest that other names for the Hunter’s Moon are the Sanguine or Blood Moon, either associated with the blood from with hunting or the turning of the leaves in autumn. Other Native American tribes, who tied the full Moon names to the season’s activities, called the full Moon the “Travel Moon” and the “Dying Grass Moon.”


The next full Moon will appear “opposite” the Sun (in Earth-based longitude) at 9:47 AM PT. The Moon will appear full for about three days centered around this time, from Tuesday morning through Thursday night

See all Moon phase dates and times (EDT) below.

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Almanac.com
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