Tag Archives: Full Worm Moon

Full Worm Moon: March 9, 2020, at 10:48 AM PT

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Full Moon
Full Moon

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From The Old Farmers Almanac.Com

Full Worm Moon – March “As the temperature begins to warm and the ground begins to thaw, earthworm casts appear, heralding the return of the robins. The more northern tribes knew this Moon as the Full Crow Moon, when the cawing of crows signaled the end of winter; or the Full Crust Moon, because the snow cover becomes crusted from thawing by day and freezing at night.’

‘The Full Sap Moon, marking the time of tapping maple trees, is another variation. To the settlers, it was also known as the Lenten Moon, and was considered to be the last full Moon of winter.”

Full Moon Names and Their Meanings

Historically, Native American and other traditional names for full Moons were used to track the seasons. Think of them as “nicknames” for the Moon! See Full Moon names for each month of the year and their meanings.
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The Old Farmers Almanac Full Worm Video

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Super Worm Moon: The First Supermoon of the Year

This full Moon will also be the first of three supermoons in 2020—the other two occurring on April 7 and May 7. Thanks to its supermoon status, this year’s Worm Moon has been named the Super Worm Moon!  Let’s just hope that the worms don’t take that to heart.

“Supermoon” is the popular nickname given to a full Moon that coincides with perigee, which is the point in the Moon’s orbit of Earth where it’s closest to our planet.

While at perigee, the full Moon appears a bit brighter and about 7% larger than a typical full Moon. However, don’t go out on the night of March 9 expecting to see a Moon that’s noticeably more massive. Unless you were to see them side by side, the differences between a supermoon and a regular full Moon can be very difficult to perceive!

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The Full Worm Moon: March 27, 2013 at 2:30 A.M. Las Vegas time

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Full Moon
Full Moon

From The Old Farmer’s Almanac:
Full Moon Video
Each month, we will explain the traditional names of the full Moon along with some fascinating Moon facts. In this video, learn about the Full Worm Moon, Moon illusion, and when and why the Moon rides high or rides low. Click below to watch video.

Historically, the Native Americans who lived in the area that is now the northern and eastern United States kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to the recurring full Moons.

Each full Moon name was applied to the entire lunar month in which it occurred.

The Full Worm Moon was given its name by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior. At the time of this spring Moon, the ground begins to soften and earthworm casts reappear, inviting the return of robins. This is also known as the Sap Moon, as it marks the time when maple sap begins to flow and the annual tapping of maple trees begins.

OUT WEST

From Western Washington University:
American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year. Here [is the information from one tribe.]

Zuni – Southwest, New Mexico
According to WWU, in the Zuni language the name for March’s Moon is: “li’dekwakkya ts’ana” or “little sand storm.”

The Old Farmer’s Almanac

Western Washington University

Things Are Looking Up: Another Full Moon On March 10, 2009

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Just The Full Moon
Just The Full Moon

LVBC Moon Page

Our Moon will be 100% full March 10, 2009
Rise 5:33 P.M. Set 6:02 A.M. – Las Vegas Time

“Historically the Native Americans who lived in the area that is now the northern and eastern United States kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to the recurring full Moons. Each full Moon name was applied to the entire month in which it occurred. These names, and some variations, were used by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior.”

“The Full Worm Moon”
“At the time of this spring Moon, the ground begins to soften and earthworm casts reappear, inviting the return of robins. This is also known as the Sap Moon, as it marks the time when maple sap begins to flow and the annual tapping of maple trees begins” more from The Old Farmer’s Almanac…

The Old Farmer’s Almanac’s Moon Phase Calendar…
The Old Farmers Almanac…
LasVegasBuffetClub’s Moon Page…
LasVegasBuffetClub’s Home Page
[FYI – The Full Moon image is not from this month. This photo was shot from the Main Street Station’s RV Park a decade ago.]