Tag Archives: Harvest Moon

Full Harvest Moon For September, 2016: Friday, September 16, at 9:45 AM PDT

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Harvest Moon
Harvest Moon

From The Old Farmer’s Almanac
For Moon fans, September, 2016 will provide plenty of Moon action! The month begins and ends with a New Moon, with the Full Moon precisely sandwiched in between, on the 16th day.

The Full Moon nearest the autumn equinox is named the Harvest Moon since, during this month, the Moon helps the harvest by providing more light at the right time than other Full Moons do.

Witness the Full Harvest Moon Eclipse Friday! Watch as the Moon Moves into Earth’s Shadow.

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In years when the Harvest Moon falls in October, the September full Moon is usually known as the Full Corn Moon because it traditionally corresponds with the time of harvesting corn. It is also called the Barley Moon because this is the time to harvest and thresh the ripened barley.

September’s Full Moon Video featuring Amy Nieskens

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LIVE HARVEST MOON SHOW!
On Friday, September 16, at 9:45 AM PDT | 12:45 PM EDT | 16:45 UTC, The Old Farmer’s Almanac is partnering with Slooh to host a broadcast of the Harvest Moon. Watch the live feed below!

Slooh will be teaming up with global feed partners in Africa, Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and Western Australia, where the eclipse is will be visible, to bring viewers the live lunar show from start to finish.

Learn what causes a Lunar Eclipse and the differences between a Total Lunar Eclipse and this week’s Penumbral Lunar Eclipse. Bob Berman, Slooh Astronomer and Astronomy Editor for The Old Farmer’s Almanac, will also be on hand to discuss the odd ways the Moon moves around our home planet, leading to these different eclipses throughout the year. He and Paul will also explore recent headlines that suggest our nearest neighbor’s origins were more violent than previously thought.

Janice Stillman, Editor of The Old Farmer’s Almanac, will offer insights into the history and folklore surrounding the Harvest Moon. They’ll discuss the different names the September Moon has been given by different cultures, and delve into some of the cultural stories and traditions surrounding the Harvest Moon, and the annual harvests associated with it.

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Watch the live stream [ CLICK HERE ] on FRIDAY, September 16, 12:45 PM (EDT)
Live Stream starts: 9:45 AM PDT ¦ 12:45 PM EDT ¦ 16:45UTC
Live Stream ends: 2:00 PM PDT ¦ 5:00 PM EDT ¦ 21:00UTC

Almanac.com Official Website
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Full Harvest (Corn Maker) Moon September 19, 2013 at 4:12AM Las Vegas Time

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Saguaro Moon
Saguaro Moon - Credit & Copyright: Stefan Seip

From The Old Farmer’s Almanac
Full Moon Names
The full Moon nearest the autumnal equinox (September 23 this year) is called the Harvest Moon. This Moon is not just the full Moon that occurs at the time of the harvest. It is the full Moon that actually helps the harvest by providing more light at the right time than other full Moons do.

The following video, featuring Amy Nieskens is from The Old Farmer’s Almanac

From The Old Farmer’s Almanac
Historically, the Native Americans who lived in the area that is now the northern and eastern United States kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to the recurring full Moons.

Each full Moon name was applied to the entire lunar month in which it occurred. These names, and some variations, were used by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior.

Full Corn Moon
This full Moon corresponds with the time of harvesting corn. It is also called the Barley Moon, because it is the time to harvest and thresh the ripened barley. The Harvest Moon is the full Moon nearest the autumnal equinox, which can occur in September or October and is bright enough to allow finishing all the harvest chores.

From Western Washington University
American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year. Here is the information for two tribes:

BACK EAST

Abenaki storyteller and writer Joseph Bruchac
Abenaki storyteller and writer Joseph Bruchac

Abenaki

Northeast, Maine
According to WWU, in the Abenaki language the name for August’s Moon is: “skamonkas” or “corn maker moon.”

OUT WEST

Comanche Spring - a one-day celebration of Comanche culture featuring Benny Tahmahkera, right, and Marla Nauni - will be Saturday in Pioneer Amphitheatre in Palo Duro Canyon State Park.
Benny Tahmahkera, right, and Marla Nauni

Comanche

Southern Plains
According to WWU, in the Comanche language the name for September’s Moon is: “taboo mua” or “paperman moon.“

The Old Farmer’s Almanac
Western Washington University

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From National Geographic Online
4 Sky Events This Week: Harvest Moon, Green Giant, and Fall Equinox
Posted by Andrew Fazekas in StarStruck on September 16, 2013

This week two of the brightest planets join forces, and sky-watchers celebrate the change of seasons with a bright full moon.

Saturn and Venus. Starting on Monday, September 16 after sunset, Venus and Saturn will be having a close encounter that will last most of the week. Low in the southwest sky, the second planet from the Sun will be the first visible—as the brightest star-like object in the entire heavens.

Look carefully next to Venus—binoculars may help—and fainter Saturn will pop out of the glare of dusk. Remember that since the two worlds are hot on the heels of the setting sun, they sink below the horizon less than an hour later.

The lord of the rings will pass only 4 degrees above the goddess of love—less than the width of your three middle fingers at arm’s length. As the week progresses both planets will appear lower in the sky each night with Venus sliding a bit towards the left of Saturn.

Even the smallest backyard telescope will show off Saturn’s iconic rings and even some of its brightest moons—like Titan and Enceladus. Read more…

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Yes there will be another Full Moon, September 29: Full Corn Moon / Harvest Moon

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Harvest Moon, Credit: Robin Osbon
Harvest Moon, Credit: Robin Osbon

Yes there will be another Full Moon – September 29, 2012 at 8:18 P.M. Las Vegas time.

From The Old Farmer’s Almanac:
The Full Corn Moon corresponds with the time of harvesting corn. It is also called the Barley Moon, because it is the time to harvest and thresh the ripened barley.

This month, we also celebrate what we call a Harvest Moon, which is the full Moon nearest the autumnal equinox. It can occur in September or October and is bright enough to allow finishing all the harvest chores.

The Full Harvest Moon is different than all our other full Moons. Around this date, the Moon rises at almost the same time for a number of nights in our northern latitudes. Learn more in our article, Shine on Harvest Moon

From Western Washington University:
American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year. Here are titles most closely associated with calendar months. [Two of those names are mentioned here]

Back East
Mohawk, Eastern Woodlands
According to WWU: in the Mohawk language the word for this months moon is, seskhoko:wa (time of much freshness)

Out West
Tlingit, Pacific Northwest Coast
According to WWU: in the Tlingit language the word for this months moon is, dis yádi (big moon)

Shine on Harvest Moon, Ruth Etting
“This song was first introduced by Nora Bayes and songwriter-husband, Jack Norworth in the Ziegfeld Follies of 1908. Ruth Etting’s performance of the song in the Ziegfeld Follies of 1931 was a tribute to Nora Bayes. The 1931 production of the Follies was the last to be produced under the direction Florenz Ziegfeld, Jr.; he died shortly thereafter in 1932. It’s interesting to note that Nora Bayes recorded this song for Victor in 1910 but it was never released.”

I’ll be out there at the appropriate time looking at the Moon, will you?

The Old Farmer’s Almanac
Western Washington University
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Full Moon – October 4, 2009: (The) Summer Moon or Harvest Moon

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Adobe Moon in the City
Adobe Moon in the City
click for larger image

Time for another Full Moon! The moon will be 100% full October 4, 2009 at 12:11 A.M. Las Vegas time.

zuni_art_thumb

OUT WEST:
“American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year. Here are titles most closely associated with calendar months”
According to Western Washington University the name for the October moon in the Zuni language is: li’dekwakkwya lana or big wind moon.

algonquin_art_thumb

Back East:
“Historically the Native Americans who lived in the area that is now the northern and eastern United States kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to the recurring full Moons. Each full Moon name was applied to the entire month in which it occurred. These names, and some variations, were used by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior.” read more from The Old Farmer’s Almanac
The Harvest Moon is the full Moon nearest the autumnal equinox and is bright enough to allow finishing all the harvest chores.

The moon will be 100% full on October, 4 at 12:11 A.M. Las Vegas time.

The [c.2009-Adobe Moon in the City] poster is available for purchase. The full moon in this poster was photographed in Las Vegas in the 90s. The image was inserted into it’s “frame” with a Photoshop type application. The poster is 24″x36″.

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