Category Archives: LVBC JUKE BOX

El Paso by Marty Robbins

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“El Paso” is a western ballad written and originally recorded by Marty Robbins, and first released on Gunfighter Ballads and Trail Songs in September 1959. It was released as a single the following month, and became a major hit on both the country and pop music charts, reaching No. 1 in both at the start of 1960 (the first No. 1 hit of the 1960s). It won the Grammy Award for Best Country & Western Recording in 1961, and remains Robbins’ best-known song.

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Death in the West

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Death in the West
Death in the West

From The NewYorker.com
“A century ago, Butte, Montana, a.k.a. Dashiell Hammett’s Poisonville, was the rowdy epicenter of American copper mining; these days, it’s a source of excellent local-history podcasts. “Richest Hill” alchemized a toxic-waste saga into riveting entertainment; the new, independently produced series “Death in the West” unspools the story of the murder of the martyred union organizer Frank Little—still regarded by many as a “recently passed comrade”—in 1917, when Butte was “a city tailor-made for conspiracy and mayhem.” Reported, written, and hosted by Chad and Zach Dundas and Erika and Leif Fredrickson, the series employs rigorous reporting, memorable details (a hook-handed gunman, a Prohibition-era speakeasy), and sophisticated sound design (cemetery crickets, archival interviews and songs), as well as local flavor: music by Montana bands, support from a record store and an ice-cream shop.”

— Sarah Larson
https://www.newyorker.com/goings-on-about-town/podcasts/death-in-the-west-11-23-20

Here’s a link to the Death in the West podcast:
https://deathinthewestpod.com/episodes

Here’s a link to my current favorite song which happens to be from from the podcast, “TUNE FOR T” by Caroline Keys.

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Glen Campbell – Gentle on My Mind

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From: Colouring The Past


From WIKI
“Gentle on My Mind” is a song written by John Hartford,[] which won four 1968 Grammy Awards. Hartford won the award for Best Folk Performance and Best Country & Western Song (Songwriter). The other two awards Best Country & Western Solo Vocal Performance, Male and Best Country & Western Recording, went to American country music singer Glen Campbell for his version of Hartford’s song.

The song was released in June 1967 as the only single from the album of the same name. It was re-released in July 1968 to more success. Glen Campbell’s version has received over 5 million plays on the radio. Campbell used “Gentle on My Mind” as the theme to his television variety show, The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour between 1969 and 1972. Dean Martin’s version, recorded in 1968, was a major hit in the United Kingdom; three versions of the song, Campbell’s, Martin’s and Patti Page’s, all reached the top ten of the U.S. easy listening chart in 1968. The song was ranked number 16 on BMI’s Top 100 Songs of the Century.[]

Read more…

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Louis Prima – Pennies from Heaven

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“Pennies from Heaven” is a 1936 American popular song with music by Arthur Johnston and lyrics by Johnny Burke.

“It was introduced by Bing Crosby with Georgie Stoll and his Orchestra in the 1936 film of the same name. It was recorded in the same year by Billie Holiday and afterwards performed by Doris Day, Jimmy Dorsey & his Orchestra, Arthur Tracy, Eddy Duchin, Tony Bennett, Dinah Washington, Clark Terry, Frances Langford, Big Joe Turner, Lester Young, Dean Martin, Gene Ammons, The Skyliners (a hit in 1960), Legion of Mary, Guy Mitchell, and Harry James.”

Louis Prima – The Call of the Wildest (1957)

Pennies From Heaven
Soloist, Vocals – Louis Prima
Tenor Saxophone – Sam Butera
Written-By – Arthur Johnston, Johnny Burke

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Astrud Gilberto and Stan Getz – The Girl From Ipanema (1964) LIVE

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
“Garota de Ipanema” (“The Girl from Ipanema”) is a Brazilian bossa nova and jazz song. It was a worldwide hit in the mid-1960s and won a Grammy for Record of the Year in 1965. It was written in 1962, with music by Antônio Carlos Jobim and Portuguese lyrics by Vinícius de Moraes. English lyrics were written later by Norman Gimbel.[1]

The first commercial recording was in 1962, by Pery Ribeiro. The Stan Getz recording featuring the vocal debut of Astrud Gilberto became an international hit. This version had been shortened from the version on the album Getz/Gilberto (recorded in March 1963, released in March 1964), which had also included the Portuguese lyrics sung by Astrud’s then husband João Gilberto. In the US, the single peaked at number five on the Billboard Hot 100, and went to number one for two weeks on the Easy Listening chart.[2] Overseas it peaked at number 29 in the United Kingdom, and charted highly throughout the world.

Numerous recordings have been used in films, sometimes as an elevator music cliché. It is believed to be the second most recorded pop song in history, after “Yesterday” by The Beatles.[3] The song was inducted into the Latin Grammy Hall of Fame in 2001.[4] In 2004, it was one of 50 recordings chosen that year by the Library of Congress to be added to the National Recording Registry.[5] In 2009, the song was voted by the Brazilian edition of Rolling Stone as the 27th greatest Brazilian song.[6]
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sVdaFQhS86E

Django Reinhardt & Stéphane Grappelli – Jattendrai Swing 1939 – LIVE!

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“Jean Reinhardt (23 January 1910 – 16 May 1953), known to all by his Romani nickname Django (French: [dʒãŋɡo ʁɛjnaʁt] or [dʒɑ̃ɡo ʁenɑʁt]), was a Belgian-born Romani-French jazz guitarist and composer. He was the first major jazz talent to emerge from Europe and remains the most significant.”

“With violinist Stéphane Grappelli,[] Reinhardt formed the Paris-based Quintette du Hot Club de France in 1934. The group was among the first to play jazz that featured the guitar as a lead instrument.[] Reinhardt recorded in France with many visiting American musicians, including Coleman Hawkins and Benny Carter, and briefly toured the United States with Duke Ellington’s orchestra in 1946. He died suddenly of a stroke at the age of 43.”

“Reinhardt’s most popular compositions have become standards within gypsy jazz, including “Minor Swing”,[] “Daphne”, “Belleville”, “Djangology”, “Swing ’42”, and “Nuages”. Jazz guitarist Frank Vignola claims that nearly every major popular-music guitarist in the world has been influenced by Reinhardt.[6] Over the last few decades, annual Django festivals have been held throughout Europe and the U.S., and a biography has been written about his life.[] In February 2017, the Berlin International Film Festival held the world premiere of the French film Django.”
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Frank Sinatra- I’ve got you under my skin

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This is, I think, the best live version. I love when he exclaims -after a rising crescendo, about 2:01 into the song- “Run for cover – run and hide!”

Here are two more versions, also great arrangements, etc.

“I’ve Got You Under My Skin” is a song written by Cole Porter in 1936. It was introduced that year in the Eleanor Powell musical film Born to Dance in which it was performed by Virginia Bruce. It was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Original Song that year.

It became a signature song for Frank Sinatra, and, in 1966, became a top 10 hit for the Four Seasons.
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Artie Shaw – Beguin The Beguine ( Cole Porter )

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Artie Shaw – Beguin The Beguine ( Cole Porter )

Begin the Beguine - Artie Shaw
Begin the Beguine – Artie Shaw

“Begin the Beguine” is a popular song written by Cole Porter. Porter composed the song between Kalabahi, Indonesia, and Fiji during a 1935 Pacific cruise aboard Cunard’s ocean liner Franconia.[] In October 1935, it was introduced by June Knight in the Broadway musical Jubilee, produced at the Imperial Theatre in New York City.[] Beguine is a dance and music form, similar to a slow rhumba.

The last part of the song – after a slow buildup – kicks A$$ like no other. WC LasVegasBuffetClub

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“The beguine is a dance and music form, similar to a slow rhumba. It was popular in the 1930s, coming from the islands of Guadeloupe and Martinique, where in local Creole Beke or Begue means a White person, and Beguine is the female form.” WIKI

Simon & Garfunkel – Bridge Over Troubled Water

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Bridge over Troubled Water” is a song composed by American singer-songwriter Paul Simon and recorded by Simon & Garfunkel. Produced by the duo and Roy Halee, the song was released as the follow-up single to “The Boxer” in January 1970. The song is featured on their fifth studio albumBridge over Troubled Water (1970). Art Garfunkel performs lead vocals over a piano accompaniment exhibiting strong influence of gospel music. The original studio recording employs elements of Phil Spector‘s “Wall of Sound” technique using L.A. session musicians from the Wrecking Crew.

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Mason Williams – Classical Gas – ORIGINAL STEREO VERSION

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Classical Gas” is an instrumental musical piece composed and originally performed by American guitarist Mason Williams with instrumental backing by members of the Wrecking Crew.[2] Originally released in 1968 on the album The Mason Williams Phonograph Record, it has been rerecorded and rereleased numerous times since by Williams. One later version served as the title track of a 1987 album by Williams and the band Mannheim Steamroller.

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