Category Archives: LVBC JUKE BOX

Astrud Gilberto and Stan Getz – The Girl From Ipanema (1964) LIVE

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
“Garota de Ipanema” (“The Girl from Ipanema”) is a Brazilian bossa nova and jazz song. It was a worldwide hit in the mid-1960s and won a Grammy for Record of the Year in 1965. It was written in 1962, with music by Antônio Carlos Jobim and Portuguese lyrics by Vinícius de Moraes. English lyrics were written later by Norman Gimbel.[1]

The first commercial recording was in 1962, by Pery Ribeiro. The Stan Getz recording featuring the vocal debut of Astrud Gilberto became an international hit. This version had been shortened from the version on the album Getz/Gilberto (recorded in March 1963, released in March 1964), which had also included the Portuguese lyrics sung by Astrud’s then husband João Gilberto. In the US, the single peaked at number five on the Billboard Hot 100, and went to number one for two weeks on the Easy Listening chart.[2] Overseas it peaked at number 29 in the United Kingdom, and charted highly throughout the world.

Numerous recordings have been used in films, sometimes as an elevator music cliché. It is believed to be the second most recorded pop song in history, after “Yesterday” by The Beatles.[3] The song was inducted into the Latin Grammy Hall of Fame in 2001.[4] In 2004, it was one of 50 recordings chosen that year by the Library of Congress to be added to the National Recording Registry.[5] In 2009, the song was voted by the Brazilian edition of Rolling Stone as the 27th greatest Brazilian song.[6]
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sVdaFQhS86E

Django Reinhardt & Stéphane Grappelli – Jattendrai Swing 1939 – LIVE!

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“Jean Reinhardt (23 January 1910 – 16 May 1953), known to all by his Romani nickname Django (French: [dʒãŋɡo ʁɛjnaʁt] or [dʒɑ̃ɡo ʁenɑʁt]), was a Belgian-born Romani-French jazz guitarist and composer. He was the first major jazz talent to emerge from Europe and remains the most significant.”

“With violinist Stéphane Grappelli,[] Reinhardt formed the Paris-based Quintette du Hot Club de France in 1934. The group was among the first to play jazz that featured the guitar as a lead instrument.[] Reinhardt recorded in France with many visiting American musicians, including Coleman Hawkins and Benny Carter, and briefly toured the United States with Duke Ellington’s orchestra in 1946. He died suddenly of a stroke at the age of 43.”

“Reinhardt’s most popular compositions have become standards within gypsy jazz, including “Minor Swing”,[] “Daphne”, “Belleville”, “Djangology”, “Swing ’42”, and “Nuages”. Jazz guitarist Frank Vignola claims that nearly every major popular-music guitarist in the world has been influenced by Reinhardt.[6] Over the last few decades, annual Django festivals have been held throughout Europe and the U.S., and a biography has been written about his life.[] In February 2017, the Berlin International Film Festival held the world premiere of the French film Django.”
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Frank Sinatra- I’ve got you under my skin

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This is, I think, the best live version. I love when he exclaims -after a rising crescendo, about 2:01 into the song- “Run for cover – run and hide!”

Here are two more versions, also great arrangements, etc.

“I’ve Got You Under My Skin” is a song written by Cole Porter in 1936. It was introduced that year in the Eleanor Powell musical film Born to Dance in which it was performed by Virginia Bruce. It was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Original Song that year.

It became a signature song for Frank Sinatra, and, in 1966, became a top 10 hit for the Four Seasons.
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Artie Shaw – Beguin The Beguine ( Cole Porter )

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Artie Shaw – Beguin The Beguine ( Cole Porter )

Begin the Beguine - Artie Shaw
Begin the Beguine – Artie Shaw

“Begin the Beguine” is a popular song written by Cole Porter. Porter composed the song between Kalabahi, Indonesia, and Fiji during a 1935 Pacific cruise aboard Cunard’s ocean liner Franconia.[] In October 1935, it was introduced by June Knight in the Broadway musical Jubilee, produced at the Imperial Theatre in New York City.[] Beguine is a dance and music form, similar to a slow rhumba.

The last part of the song – after a slow buildup – kicks A$$ like no other. WC LasVegasBuffetClub

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“The beguine is a dance and music form, similar to a slow rhumba. It was popular in the 1930s, coming from the islands of Guadeloupe and Martinique, where in local Creole Beke or Begue means a White person, and Beguine is the female form.” WIKI

Simon & Garfunkel – Bridge Over Troubled Water

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Bridge over Troubled Water” is a song composed by American singer-songwriter Paul Simon and recorded by Simon & Garfunkel. Produced by the duo and Roy Halee, the song was released as the follow-up single to “The Boxer” in January 1970. The song is featured on their fifth studio albumBridge over Troubled Water (1970). Art Garfunkel performs lead vocals over a piano accompaniment exhibiting strong influence of gospel music. The original studio recording employs elements of Phil Spector‘s “Wall of Sound” technique using L.A. session musicians from the Wrecking Crew.

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Mason Williams – Classical Gas – ORIGINAL STEREO VERSION

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Classical Gas” is an instrumental musical piece composed and originally performed by American guitarist Mason Williams with instrumental backing by members of the Wrecking Crew.[2] Originally released in 1968 on the album The Mason Williams Phonograph Record, it has been rerecorded and rereleased numerous times since by Williams. One later version served as the title track of a 1987 album by Williams and the band Mannheim Steamroller.

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Fever by Peggy Lee

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Peggy Lee: Fever!
Peggy Lee: Fever!

Fever” is a song written by Eddie Cooley and Otis Blackwell, who used the pseudonym John Davenport. It was originally recorded by American R&B singer Little Willie John for his debut album, Fever (1956), and released as a single in April of the same year. The song topped the Billboard R&B Best Sellers in the US and peak at number 24 on the Billboard pop chart.[1] It was received positively by music critics and included on several lists of the best songs during the time it was released.

It has been covered by numerous artists from various musical genres, most notably by Peggy Lee, whose 1958 rendition became the most widely known version of “Fever” and the singer’s signature song. Lee’s version contained rewritten lyrics different from the original and an altered music arrangement. It became a top-five hit on the music charts in the UK and Australia in addition to entering the top ten in the US and the Netherlands. “Fever” was nominated in three categories at the 1st Annual Grammy Awards in 1959, including Record of the Year and Song of the Year.

Peggy Lee’s alluring tone, distinctive delivery, breadth of material, and ability to write many of her own songs made her one of the most captivating artists of the vocal era, from her breakthrough on the Benny Goodman hit “Why Don’t You Do Right” to her many solo successes, singles including “Mañana,” “Lover” and “Fever” that showed her bewitching vocal power, a balance between sultry swing and impeccable musicianship. Born Norma Egstrom in Jamestown, North Dakota, she suffered the death of her mother at the age of four and endured a difficult stepmother after her father remarried. Given her sense of swing by listening to Count Basie on the radio, she taught herself to sing and made her radio debut at the age of 14. She made the jump to Fargo (where she was christened Peggy Lee), then to Minneapolis and St. Louis to sing with a regional band. Lee twice journeyed to Hollywood to make her fortune, but returned unsuccessful from both trips.

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Come And Go With Me – The Dell Vikings

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Come Go With Me” is a song written by C. E. Quick (a.k.a. Clarence Quick), an original member (bass vocalist) of the American doo-wop vocal group The Del-Vikings.[1] The song was originally recorded by The Del-Vikings in 1956 and was released on Fee Bee Records. Norman Wright was the lead vocalist on this song.[2] When the group signed with Dot Records in 1957, the song became a hit, peaking at No. 4 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.[3] The song was later featured in the films American Graffiti (1973), Diner (1982), Stand by Me (1986), Joe Versus the Volcano (1990), and Set It Up (2018).[4] It was included in Robert Christgau‘s “Basic Record Library” of 1950s and 1960s recordings, published in Christgau’s Record Guide: Rock Albums of the Seventies (1981).[5] It sold over one million copies and was awarded a gold disc.[6]

Rolling Stone magazine ranked the song No. 449 on its list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.[7] – WIKI

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Cherry Pie Skip & Flip

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“Cherry Pie” is a song written by Joe Josea and originally performed by Marvin & Johnny in 1954 as the B-side to their single “Tick Tock”.

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Happy Birthday John Lennon!

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Willie and Lukas Nelson…Happy Birthday John Lennon
Willie and Lukas Nelson…Happy Birthday John Lennon

Willie Nelson and sons pay tribute to John Lennon with ‘Watching The Wheels’ cover

Willie Nelson and sons Lukas and Micah have paid tribute to John Lennon on his birthday with a cover of ‘Watching The Wheels’ – you can watch it above.

Yesterday (October 9) marked what would have been the Beatles legend’s 80th birthday and among the celebrations were numerous tributes by fans and fellow artists.

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