Tag Archives: Full Moon

The “Moon When The Wolves Run Together” 100% full at 2:30 EST, December 2, 2009

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather
The LasVegasBuffetClub's Adobe Moon In The City poster
The LasVegasBuffetClub's
Adobe Moon In The City poster

The Moon When The Wolves Run Together will be 100% full at 2:32 a.m. (EST) on December 2, 2009.

*Depending on the source and geographical location the full moon on December 2, 2009 is called one or more of the following: Full Cold Moon, Snow Moon or Moon When The Wolves Run Together.

Out West

Cherokee Woman - Western Washington University image
Beautiful Cherokee Woman
Western Washington University image

“American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year.”

The December moon is called “vskihyi” in the Cherokee language or “Snow Moon,” according to WWU.

This is Western Washington University’s list of Native American Full Moon names.

Back East

ABENAKI ART - WWU image
ABENAKI ART - WWU image

Full Moon names date back to Native Americans, of what is now the northern and eastern United States. The tribes kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full Moon. Their names were applied to the entire month in which each occurred. There was some variation in the Moon names, but in general, the same ones were current throughout the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior. European settlers followed that custom and created some of their own names. Since the lunar month is only 29 days long on the average, the full Moon dates shift from year to year. Following is the Farmers Almanac’s list of the full Moon names. (See Western Washington University’s list above)

FULL COLD MOON – This is the month when the winter cold fastens its grip and the nights become long and dark. This full Moon is also called the Long Nights Moon by some Native American tribes.

The [c.2009-Adobe Moon in the City] poster is available for purchase. The full moon in this poster was photographed in Las Vegas in the 90s. The image was inserted into it’s “frame” with a Photoshop type application. The poster is 24″x36″.

*Full Beaver Moon on November 2, 2009

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather
Adobe Moon in the City
Adobe Moon in the City
click for larger image

*Depending on the source and geographical location the full moon on November 2, 2009 is called one or more of the following: Full Beaver Moon, Full Hunters Moon or Heading to Winter Moon.
The full moon on November 2 will be 100% full at 11:15 P.M. Las Vegas time.

Out West

Comanche Arrowhead
Comanche Arrowhead

“American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year.”

In the Comanche (Southern Plains) language, the November Full Moon is “yubaubi mua” – “Heading to Winter Moon.”

Here is Western Washington University’s list of Native American Full Moon names.

Back East

algonquin_art_thumb

Full Moon names date back to Native Americans, of what is now the northern and eastern United States. The tribes kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full Moon. Their names were applied to the entire month in which each occurred. There was some variation in the Moon names, but in general, the same ones were current throughout the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior. European settlers followed that custom and created some of their own names. Since the lunar month is only 29 days long on the average, the full Moon dates shift from year to year. Here is the Farmers Almanac’s list of the full Moon names.

Full Beaver Moon – November This was the time to set beaver traps before the swamps froze, to ensure a supply of warm winter furs. Another interpretation suggests that the name Full Beaver Moon comes from the fact that the beavers are now actively preparing for winter. It is sometimes also referred to as the Frosty Moon.

The [c.2009-Adobe Moon in the City] poster is available for purchase. The full moon in this poster was photographed in Las Vegas in the 90s. The image was inserted into it’s “frame” with a Photoshop type application. The poster is 24″x36″.

Visit the main pages of LasVegasBuffetClub.com

Full Moon – October 4, 2009: (The) Summer Moon or Harvest Moon

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather
Adobe Moon in the City
Adobe Moon in the City
click for larger image

Time for another Full Moon! The moon will be 100% full October 4, 2009 at 12:11 A.M. Las Vegas time.

zuni_art_thumb

OUT WEST:
“American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year. Here are titles most closely associated with calendar months”
According to Western Washington University the name for the October moon in the Zuni language is: li’dekwakkwya lana or big wind moon.

algonquin_art_thumb

Back East:
“Historically the Native Americans who lived in the area that is now the northern and eastern United States kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to the recurring full Moons. Each full Moon name was applied to the entire month in which it occurred. These names, and some variations, were used by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior.” read more from The Old Farmer’s Almanac
The Harvest Moon is the full Moon nearest the autumnal equinox and is bright enough to allow finishing all the harvest chores.

The moon will be 100% full on October, 4 at 12:11 A.M. Las Vegas time.

The [c.2009-Adobe Moon in the City] poster is available for purchase. The full moon in this poster was photographed in Las Vegas in the 90s. The image was inserted into it’s “frame” with a Photoshop type application. The poster is 24″x36″.

Visit the main pages of LasVegasBuffetClub.com

Hottest dinner ticket in Denver: Patsy’s Inn on First Friday

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather
Patsy's Inn 
Credit: LasVegasBuffetClub, file photo
Patsy's Inn
Credit: LasVegasBuffetClub, file photo

I was doing Navajo street’s “First Fridays Art Walk” on, guess what, Friday night, and was drawn to *Patsy’s (Patsy’s Inn restaurant ) front door like the proverbial moth to a flame. Actually my first stop was going to be Patsy’s. The open door of Patsy’s was emenating energy not altogether unlike the exceptionally bright, (almost) full moon. Maybe it was more like a bonfire, which was burning, in the midst of the smaller campfires – lights from gallery windows. Whatever it was, it was an energy fest.

In addition to the (half-dozen) open art galleries, there was a birthday party (or some other kind of party) going on at the restaurant, adding immensely to the overall ambience of the evening. The entire block was “happening.” Oh yea, the Bug Theater, across the street from Patsy’s was open for business: “Modern Muse Theatre Presents: “SPEED THE PLOW” by David Mamet.”

When I say “it was happening,” I don’t just mean activity, I’m talking classy people in a classy scene. I was at another place near 8th & Colorado Blvd. (which I won’t name) earlier in the evening. The crowd were a bunch of dead-brains with not enough collective imagination to have a bad idea! (I’ve got to write that place off…)

After Patsy’s I headed a block south to the D Gallery ( I received an email invite to their METRO RETRO show.) What a fine gallery. The food spread was tastefully executed – a veritable work of art. I also found two other delicious pieces d’art: artists Jim Petty and Marlene Feinholz each had, at least, one work that passed my threshold test….

*By the way, Patsy’s Inn is a long-time favorite, old-school, neighborhood, Italian restaurant that has been around since the 1920s.
PATSY’S INN Italian Restaurant
3651 Navajo Street
Denver, CO 80211
303-477-8910

Full Moon – August 5: (The) Full Harvest Moon

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather
Adobe Moon in the City
Adobe Moon in the City
click for larger image

Time for another Full Moon! The moon will be 100% full August 5, 2009 at 5:56 P.M. Las Vegas time.

zuni_art_thumb

OUT WEST:
“American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year. Here are titles most closely associated with calendar months” read more from The Western Washington University Planetarium Website

According to Western Washington University, The Comanche of the Southern Plains refer to this August (5th) Full Moon as: “tahma mua” or summer moon (click the WWU link above for more information.)

algonquin_art_thumb

Back East:
“Historically the Native Americans who lived in the area that is now the northern and eastern United States kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to the recurring full Moons. Each full Moon name was applied to the entire month in which it occurred. These names, and some variations, were used by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior.” read more from The Old Farmer’s Almanac

The full Moon name for this month is Full Sturgeon Moon. Some Native American tribes knew that the sturgeon of the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain were most readily caught during this full Moon. Others called it the Green Corn Moon or the Grain Moon.”

Astrologically speaking:
Full Moon in Aquarius, By Molly Hall at About.com
“This year’s Aquarius Full Moon is on August 5/6, depending on your time zone, and is preceded by a penumbral (partial) lunar eclipse. The lunar eclipse is exact August 5th, at 8:39 pm EDT, with the full Moon exact at 8:55 pm EDT.” read more from Molly Hall at About.com

The [c.2009-Adobe Moon in the City] poster is available for purchase. The full moon in this poster was photographed in Las Vegas in the 90s. The image was inserted into it’s “frame” with a Photoshop type application. The poster is 24″x36″.

Visit the main pages of LasVegasBuffetClub.com

“FULL BUCK MOON” July 7th, 2009

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

amitc-neon4x3 …click for larger image *This is the “Adobe Moon in the City” poster.

The “FULL BUCK MOON” will be 100% full at 2:22 a.m. July 7, 2009, Las Vegas time.

OUT WEST

“American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year. Here are titles most closely associated with calendar months” read more from The Western Washington University Planetarium Website

In the Zuni language, the name for The July [7] Moon is: “dayamcho yachunne” (“when limbs of trees are broken by fruit.”)

The Zuni Tribe of Southwestern New Mexico

=====================================================================

BACK EAST

“Historically the Native Americans who lived in the area that is now the northern and eastern United States kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to the recurring full Moons. Each full Moon name was applied to the entire month in which it occurred. These names, and some variations, were used by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior.” read more from The Old Farmer’s Almanac

The Full Buck Moon “The full Moon name for this month is Full Buck Moon. Bucks begin to grow new antlers at this time. This full Moon was also known as the Thunder Moon, because thunderstorms are so frequent during this month.”

[Both of the above sites seem to disagree on the official moon names. Just pick one!]

“Here is the chart for the Full Moon in Capricorn, exact on July 7th at 5:21 am EDT, followed by a penumbral (partial) lunar eclipse at 5:38 am EDT.” read more from About.com… This is an insightful perspective from an astrologer. [Variances in FM times are due to geographical differences.]

*The [c.2009-Adobe Moon in the City] poster is available for purchase. The full moon in this poster was photographed in Las Vegas in the 90s. The image was inserted into it’s “frame” with a Photoshop type application. The poster is 24″x36″.

View our blog post on The Man In the Moon, from November, 2007.

View the LasVegasBuffetClub’s main pages

And Yet Another Full Moon: *FULL STRAWBERRY MOON – June 7, 2009

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

just-the-full-moon

The Full Strawberry Moon will be 100% full on June 7, 2009 at 11:12 A.M., Las Vegas time.

BACK EAST
“Historically the Native Americans who lived in the area that is now the northern and eastern United States kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to the recurring full Moons. Each full Moon name was applied to the entire month in which it occurred. These names, and some variations, were used by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior” read more from The Old Farmer’s Almanac
*FULL STRAWBERRY MOON “The Algonquin tribes knew this Moon as a time to gather ripening strawberries. It is also known as the Rose Moon and the Hot Moon.”

OUT WEST
“American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year. Here are titles most closely associated with calendar months” read more…
(From the) Zuni Tribe of Southwest, New Mexico: The name of June’s Full Moon: “ik’ohbu yachunne” or “turning moon.”

Access more information for Native American Tribes

Visit the main pages of the LasVegasBuffetClub

April’s FULL MOON Will Be 100% Full – April 9, 2009 at 7:55 A.M. – Las Vegas Time.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather
Just the Full Moon
Just the Full Moon

“Historically the Native Americans who lived in the area that is now the northern and eastern United States kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to the recurring full Moons. Each full Moon name was applied to the entire month in which it occurred. These names, and some variations, were used by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior” read more from The Old Farmers Almanac…

“The full Moon name for this month is Full Pink Moon. This full Moon heralded the appearance of the grass pink, or wild ground phlox—one of the first spring flowers. It is also known as the Sprouting Grass Moon, the Egg Moon, and the Fish Moon” read more from The Old Farmers Almanac…

The full Pink Moon will be full Thursday April 9, 2009 at 7:55 A.M. Las Vegas time…

The Shoshone (Nevada) name for the April Full Moon is “badua’-mea'” meaning “Melting,” according to WWU.EDU read more…

American Indian Moons (Moon Names – 29 tribes) “American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year. Here are titles most closely associated with calendar months” read more from the Western Washington University Website…

Visit the main pages of the LasVegasBuffetClub…
Or…Click the Website link above, on your right…

Things Are Looking Up: Another Full Moon On March 10, 2009

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather
Just The Full Moon
Just The Full Moon

LVBC Moon Page

Our Moon will be 100% full March 10, 2009
Rise 5:33 P.M. Set 6:02 A.M. – Las Vegas Time

“Historically the Native Americans who lived in the area that is now the northern and eastern United States kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to the recurring full Moons. Each full Moon name was applied to the entire month in which it occurred. These names, and some variations, were used by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior.”

“The Full Worm Moon”
“At the time of this spring Moon, the ground begins to soften and earthworm casts reappear, inviting the return of robins. This is also known as the Sap Moon, as it marks the time when maple sap begins to flow and the annual tapping of maple trees begins” more from The Old Farmer’s Almanac…

The Old Farmer’s Almanac’s Moon Phase Calendar…
The Old Farmers Almanac…
LasVegasBuffetClub’s Moon Page…
LasVegasBuffetClub’s Home Page
[FYI – The Full Moon image is not from this month. This photo was shot from the Main Street Station’s RV Park a decade ago.]